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  2. LLC

    First post on FOH?

    August 16, 2011 with 3260 posts. Don’t know what the first one was but I know I joined because Rob and Hamlet were coming to Toronto for a MegaHert[emoji3481]. I had been lurking but that made me decide to join. Best move ever, as I met many people at that event that are great friend to this day. Since then met a lot of other people because of cigars since then from all around the world. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  3. Habana Mike

    First post on FOH?

    Right! And you joined in January 2015 7,283 posts - quite prolific indeed! There, did it for you!
  4. JohnS

    First post on FOH?

    When the forum was upgraded a few years ago some posts from the past were lost. I mean, I lost 8 posts myself!
  5. ... it think a little fact checking is in order here. I am not here often enough these days to want to get into what I would normally consider a spirited debate of the policies and preferred tactics of the left and right. Both can hatch their share of crazies. Take a moment to research those that attempt to kill presidents... mostly left leaning or right leaning? You mention Christchurch, so be it. How about the hoards of others who have a left bias? Want to talk about the Bernie Sanders supporter who shot up the Congressional baseball game. Lets start a list and look at the score card. Ultimately however there is a difference between criminal, citizen oriented hate and the crime that surrounds it, and the wholesale slaughter of entire states in events commonly referred to as genocide. Genocide is more commonly associated with socialism (national socialism for example), Soviet Marxist/Leninist socialism, and all flavors of other leftest dogma oriented governments from China, Cambodia and a host of other leftist run countries. When comparing the right and the left, one might take note that the right offers one the opportunity to defend one's self and property, freedom, sovereignty. The left on the other hand empowers the state, creating the very possibility of an 'insane' leader killing millions. Venezuela, once the jewel of central America, where is she now? That is not the 'right' at work. Me, I would prefer to go down fighting and rather not be left to starve as some leader would dictate as they try collective farming, or some other far out leftist idea to perfect man. I sit proudly on the right. I have the right to protect myself and have both the self control and the respect for life, and property that keeps me from assailing anyone. That is because I still have at least some respect for the rule of law. When you are on the right you maintain that individuals can keep power and not abuse others with it. On the left they have no such believe or confidence. Yet it is on the left that the there is history of government sanctioned genocide, the very abuse of power that kills not a few dozen people, but dozens of millions of people. Yet the left, unwilling to acknowledge history and continues to press its agenda of central power, planning and distrust of the citizenry. Both sides carry some guilt for localized crime. One side carries the burden of millions of deaths and genocide. I choose to believe history. I choose to empower myself and my fellow citizens to defend themselves, a mantra of the right. And the mantra of the left, high taxes, high regulation, a slow economy, poorly run healthcare, poorly run schools, frustrations of red tape... with no escape... and good old plain tobacco packaging... Look at LA, SF, NY, Chitown.... Needles in parks, homeless gangs on the streets, massive death counts due to crime, human shit in the subways...! Who runs those towns, right or left? Lawlessness! Look no farther than the left. Case rests. Cheers! -Piggy
  6. Today
  7. So I joined in January 2007 and have had a post or two since then. Was looking at the profile and clicked the "SEE MY ACTIVITY" button. Shows 5,506 posts and 237 pages of history! Clicked the double right arrow >> to go to the first posts and, while I am absolutely certain I posted prior, this is the first one in the history: Curious when you joined, how many posts and post up a link to your first! PS: Vindicated on the RACF regardless of Rob's initial take!
  8. I can see it in VR. You described it perfectly. La Gloria Cubana No 2 does it for me. Clean Cuban tobacco at it's finest. There are cascading flavours everywhere but it is all underpinned by pure Cuban tobacco.
  9. wade1979

    FOH'ers Daily Smoke

    Enjoying this SLR on the deck, after power washing said deck. Enjoy your weekend FOH!
  10. CampDelta369

    FOH'ers Daily Smoke

    Partagas evening. Perfect finish to the day that started out with clouds and drizzle. A too firm of a roll and regrets my Easy Draw is at home. Going to suck it up. Starts out nuts, cream, leather, black coffee w a spice hit. A beautiful wrapper. Cheers boys.
  11. Congratulations! Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk
  12. while these some in just over 40. I would say quality is amazing ! Even at 100 a bottle Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  13. Correct. My error. All sweet!
  14. sooooo annoying Perla/Minuto/Half Corona ......all good. Corona Gorda is lumped in with a few others in two weeks. I now remember why I stopped doing it this way
  15. JayHabanos

    FOH'ers Daily Smoke

    Romeo y Julieta- Short Churchill Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  16. Both very good .Aet series at $39 Bishop..around 35 notes
  17. MIKA27

    FORMULA 1

    Webber-owned Red Bull F1 car is a Vettel race winner The Red Bull Racing RB6 that Mark Webber has in his personal car collection is a Sebastian Vettel race winner. Webber was supposed to be given his Monaco GP winner at the end of the 2010 season, however that chassis was destroyed by his infamous backflip in Valencia. Instead he had to settle for chassis 03, which started life as Vettel's 'Luscious Liz' car, and helped the German to victory at that year's Malaysian Grand Prix. Vettel continued to race the car until Monaco before complaints of poor handling saw him debut a new car at the Turkish Grand Prix. A hairline fracture in chassis 03 was later repaired and Webber took over the car after Valencia, winning the British Grand Prix – where he made the "not bad for a number two driver" comment post-race – and the Hungarian Grand Prix. He then crashed the car in South Korea, which effectively ended his 2010 title hopes. "As part of our contract negotiations we said, 'at the end of the year, can we have a car?'," Webber told the V8 Sleuth podcast. "I won Monaco in 2010 but I destroyed that car in Valencia, so I went to the next-best car – [from] when I said: 'Not bad for a number two driver…' "That one's got a bit of history, that's a good car to own. Sebastian won the Malaysian GP in it that year, and I won the Hungarian and British GP. There's a lot of fastest laps and podiums… it's a pretty special chassis, that one. "Red Bull, the guys did an absolute incredible [restoration] job. That car is absolutely as it crossed the line. Beautiful, beautiful car. Everything, right [down] to the sticker of the British Grand Prix for 2010. "That car is in a museum at the moment and will be in the new Silverstone museum when it opens. While not permanently resigned to being a museum piece, Webber hinted that the car is unlikely to run again – despite constant requests from former Porsche teammate Timo Bernhard to have a go. "It could run, but I think I'd need 15 [Renault engineers] over to have a test day somewhere with it. Timo Bernhard, my teammate at Porsche, has always been busting my nuts that 'we've got to do a track day!' "But I'm not as enthusiastic as he is!"
  18. MIKA27

    FORMULA 1

    "Silly" Ferrari rules veto "makes no sense" for F1 - Williams Claire Williams says it is "silly" and "makes no sense" that Ferrari can veto Formula 1 rules and is expected to keep that right despite sweeping changes planned for 2021. F1's governance is a democratic process but Ferrari has had the ability to block a regulation change for decades. Ferrari team principal Mattia Binotto said during the previous grand prix weekend in Spain that he was optimistic of keeping the veto amid discussions over F1's 2021 rule overhaul and Ferrari's negotiations to continue in grand prix racing. Binotto said that Ferrari's veto was "not only protecting us, but it's protecting all the teams hopefully we can keep the same rights", but that has been countered by several of Ferrari's rivals. Asked if she agreed with Ferrari's right to have a veto, Williams's deputy team principal said: "No, I think it's just silly, if I can be honest. I have a problem in our sport anyway in the fact I feel it's far too democratic. I've been quite open about that. "I feel that F1 and the FIA should take more ownership in the regulations. We want it too much in a collegiate way, which is detrimental when we all have our own agendas. "We need to be looking at this sport and its sustainability for the future, protecting it and protecting the true DNA of that. Doing that by committee can be very difficult. I don't think one team should have the right to a veto. That makes no sense to me at all." Williams's stance was backed up by fellow team chiefs who joined her in Thursday's official FIA press conference in Monaco. Red Bull team principal Christian Horner called Ferrari's veto "pretty outdated". "You can view it two ways: it's a safety net because they're representing the teams but also they're representing Ferrari," he said. "Probably, if we're going for a clean sheet of paper, it would make sense for it not to be there, as Claire says, the same rules for everyone." F1 and the FIA are finalising wide-ranging changes to the world championship, including sporting, technical, regulatory and financial matters. Renault F1 boss Cyril Abiteboul and McLaren F1 CEO Zak Brown believe that the rulemakers could look to honour Ferrari's history in another way. "We need F1 to be progressive, rather than defensive," said Abiteboul. "An ability to block due process that can be perceived or deemed to be a positive for the sport is probably not good. "We completely recognise the specific value of Ferrari to the sport, which can be reflected probably in the commercial agreement and not into the governance." Brown joked that "it's very kind of him [Binotto] to offer to represent the teams' interests". "I think we all have varying interests," said Brown. "So, we're best having our own individual negotiations, when and if that is appropriate. As Cyril said, Ferrari bring a tremendous amount to the sport, and that can be recognised in other ways."
  19. Asians are disproportionately lactose intolerant. Why milkshakes, except as a racist dog whistle? I don’t know about you, but I feel victimized and triggered.
  20. obviously you should try one and compare the experience with the BBf. are the PCs getting to taste like the bbf, are they showing more maturity than the boxes you have ? all years of cigars will not mature the same,so you should monitor the '14 box carefully,and enjoy them when you think they are at the top of flavor. also seek out more mature Bolis and get a wider range of knowledge about them....
  21. MIKA27

    FORMULA 1

    Ferrari to stick with current front wing concept Ferrari says it plans to stick with its current front wing concept, despite rivals Mercedes dominating Formula 1 with an alternative design. There was much intrigue at the start of the year about the different choices that Ferrari and Mercedes had made, with the two outfits opting for radically different front wings. Mercedes had elected for a higher downforce solution, while Ferrari preferred a design that helped better manage outwash for improved aero efficiency. Following its defeat at the Spanish Grand Prix, Ferrari had admitted that it had to consider the fact it may have got its concept wrong judging by how far behind Mercedes it had fallen. But ahead of the Monaco Grand Prix, team principal Mattia Binotto said recent investigations had left the team assured that its front wing choice was not a factor in its struggles. "I think we do not need to change our front wing," he said when asked by Motorsport.com if the team felt it needed a different front wing solution. "Simply it is a different concept to Mercedes, but it doesn't mean that we have achieved the maximum of its concept today. We are not foreseeing to change the wing concept. "The Mercedes style was checked at the start of our project so it is a comparison that we did at the start which was for one way of development. Certainly through the season you always try to double check back what you did to see if it was the right choice, but we do not foresee a change right now." Binotto said that Ferrari's main consideration at the moment was evaluating the pursuit of higher downforce developments for its car – with it believing its current low-drag focus is not helping it get the most out of Formula 1's 2019 tyres. "The tyres of this season are quite different from the ones of last season," explained Binotto. "The main difference is that last year we had very good warm up with the tyres and we were all focused and concentrating on cooling the tyres as much as we could, to keep them working because the lower was the temperature the better was the grip. "The tyres of this season are quite different in this respect. Warm up is a lot more difficult and let me say what we may call the window, the temperature target of when you have the best grip from the tyres itself, in order to achieve it you need to heat up the tyres. "How can you achieve that? You can achieve that through braking temperatures, it is rims cooling, but also it is downforce no doubt. Not only the downforce has an absolute value, but it is how you may balance the downforce high speed to low speed. It may be as well how you may even target your aero development efficiency versus maximum downforce itself. "I think we have a car that is somehow quite efficient, as you can see on the straights, but it doesn't mean we have the car that has the highest downforce in the pit lane. "It is right to question ourselves if we should look for different overall targets of how to achieve the final performance." As well as making changes to the aero development path, Binotto has suggested that alterations may need to be made to its front suspension to help its performance too. "What we are lacking is grip from the tyres because we are not able to make them work properly," he said. "And that is interaction is between aero and mechanical, and overall it is a balance. "You may set up your car to be strong in high speed and then you miss some balance and performance low speed. If a car is well balanced then you have performance in medium, high speed and low speed – and what we are lacking is the optimum in all conditions." He added: "We need to develop the car. We need to improve, so there may be changes on the front suspension yes, as we may change aero, as you may change cooling. But I don't think that in the suspension itself there is something of principle that is wrong."
  22. MIKA27

    FORMULA 1

    Ferrari considering bringing back Resta from Alfa Ferrari is evaluating whether to bring back Alfa Romeo technical director Simone Resta to bolster its Formula 1 team. Resta was Ferrari's head of vehicle project coordination until the middle of last year, and had fulfilled the role of chief designer since the end of 2014. He joined Ferrari customer team Sauber, which has become Alfa Romeo, to be its technical director on July 1. However, as Ferrari seeks to improve its structure under new team principal Mattia Binotto, amid a problematic start to the 2019 season, consideration has been given to Resta returning to Maranello. "Yeah, I heard the rumours," Binotto said when asked by Motorsport.com to comment on speculation Resta could return to Ferrari. "As a team, no doubt we are always trying to improve ourselves by looking where maybe we miss strengths. Simone has been in Ferrari in the past. He moved to be Alfa Romeo's technical director, he's having a great experience. "We are evaluating him to be back at a certain stage. It's not something we've decided. We've covered his role currently in Maranello anyway, so it's not a plug-in situation. "It's true that we are thinking, as we are thinking for other people that may join or may leave. As an organisation it's always very dynamic, and that's normal." When Resta left his responsibilities were taken on by his deputy Fabio Montecchi, chief aerodynamicist David Sanchez and former Ferrari GT aero genius Enrico Cardile. Ferrari's leadership structure is also very different to this time last year, with Binotto in the team principal role and his previous position as chief technical officer not directly replaced. Sanchez and powertrain head Corrado Iotti support Binotto on the technical side, while Laurent Mekies joined as sporting director at the end of 2018. "A lot of us moved into new roles recently," said Binotto. "In that respect we are quite a young team. It has got advantages no doubt, because it means fresh ideas, maybe some more creativity, it means some dynamic way of thinking and developing. "But also we need to assess our organisation, get more experience in the role and make sure that as a team overall we are growing in that respect." Binotto said his promotion to team principal did not leave a traditional void to fill because "I was certainly not the standard classical technical director that you may find in F1". He explained this is because Ferrari houses its engine and chassis departments under one roof. "I was technical director of both sides so it means that you cannot be a specialist of the engine, the ERS, the batteries, the aero, the chassis," he said. "It means the technical director was really the managing role. Since I move to the team principal we reorganised a bit internally, because I need to be supported, especially on the technical side. It is not any more the same team but it is not really true that I have a double role."
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