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  2. Sorry for the late annoucement of the draw of the aged box of Por Larranaga Petit Corona from the Premium Tubo Day sale Friday week The winner is TURNSTYLES Congratulations David and please send me an email when you can Back to work I go
  3. Hoepssa

    Padrón Dámaso

    One is enough if you know the flavor of 'Padron'. if Cohiba having $5 stick product, it won't be 'Cohiba' soon.
  4. On a fluke I picked up a book in 1997 and got hooked. 22 years later this is my ending. Horrible. I don’t think I saw a single cigar or pipe. Right?
  5. This is the second BPC I've had in 2ish weeks. The first one was not dryboxed, however the entire stash had been resting at a steady 62Rh for two months. That was so full flavored from the get go, came on strong and stayed strong. In fact, I was rather overwhelmed. Now for the review weekend, I happened to have a second BPC dryboxing for over a week. It must have done some good, in the sense that I am now able to discern the progression of flavors. The first third is all woody and earthy. Pretty light, a slow introduction. No sweetness. The middle third comes, and my taste buds are hit with a vanilla/coffee subtle sweetness. Now it's tasting real good. I'm enjoying this. It's not sweet as in Corona Junior sweetness, just enough that I want more. I continue to puff slowly, enjoying every mouthful, retrohaling each time to savor the thick slightly creamy smoke. The final third is full flavored, continuing the same flavors, with wood and a tinny bit of spice appearing. At some point that subtle sweetness disappears. Bitter coffee starts to take over, even though I've heeded warnings from other reviews to smoke it very slowly. I bet another year will make this batch even better. I want to enjoy succinct clear flavors with some of my 2016/2015 cigars from other marcas. I give this one an 86, basing it on my level of satisfaction. I'll come back to these BPCs in 2-3 months to see how they're coming along. PS. It started to rain/drizzle, but I was sheltered and didn't get wet.
  6. mwaller

    Calvados

    Try Berneroy VSOP for about $20... I don't think you'll be disappointed.
  7. Soooo.....that was the worst episode of GoT I've ever seen. Total let down. Horrible writing. Too many jumps. Wow. Disappointed to say the least.
  8. havanaclub

    FOH'ers Daily Smoke

    Thanks to FoH, @El Presidente, Lisa and crew for this H Upmann from a winnings draw. This is my second Upmann anejados and they are pretty darn good imo. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  9. Scored this box of 10 not too long ago. This is the second one out of the box. Wrapper smelled like cedar, of course. Perfect light draw, cold draw was dark choc brownies. First puffs were a dark chocolate covered walnut, then some peanut. Then some brownie/bready finish, but all still dark bolivar style. Second third was all earth, leather, coffee bean. Occasional light cocoa powder. Twangy finish. I let it go out in the last third, and the relight may have added to some harshness. Either that or they just need more time. It's gonna be hard to let these rest much longer.
  10. bayala

    24:24 MONDAY

    It's a special where you're getting two boxes at a good discount.
  11. Amisfield Pinot Noir, Central Otago, NZ
  12. Today
  13. LonesomeHabanoAficionado

    FOH'ers Daily Smoke

    CORO is always one of the best CC Robustos in the market! You use the same size of my Stinky Cigar Ashtray, standard 4-stirrups! I really like this cigar ashtray so much due to its deep bowl, size and 4 flat stirrups for herf (price is really cheap too)!
  14. HopeUgood

    24:24 MONDAY

    I did a 1/4 box of the RyJ #4 and 1/4 box of the PLPC to try out.
  15. This can be found for $40-ish, and when you do find it at that price, you buy it. I love giving it to friends who are not big fans of Zin, it always impresses. Biale Black Chicken
  16. LonesomeHabanoAficionado

    Bolivar Royal Coronas 2009 (BWRC)

    No problem! I was also once rookie who had lots of confusion about CCs! Me and other FOH members are always around to assist you 😄! By the way, you use the Stinky Cigar Ashtray like me! Mine is standard 4-stirrups Stinky Cigar Ashtray and what about yours?
  17. Cigar : Bolivar Coronas Junior (4-3/8 x 42) Specs : ETP FEB 17 (2yr 4mo), 7 weeks humidor rest, 65% RH, single torch butane lighter, smoking outside on the deck, 70 degrees F here in the Pacific Northwest, did not dry box. Disclaimer : I am a cigar noob with less than 200 smokes under my belt. I smoke Minutos mostly because I have a newborn to take care of. Wife is at the gym and baby just went down for a nap. Initial notes : This is the 4th cigar from this box that I’ve smoked. Construction looks great with a nice box press, although this one feels a bit harder packed than others I’ve had. Draw is a bit tight. I don’t mind a bit of resistance, especially on such a short stick, but I notice a sizable plug at the head, so out comes the Perfect Draw tool. I’m not great at picking out flavors, but there is a tiny bit of bright bitterness, lots of mid-range mineral, tiny bit of leather and tiny bit of sweetness in the background. Overall, the cigar is incredibly smooth and medium bodied at the moment. I don’t expect a ton of transitions for such a tiny stick, but I don’t mind that as I’m digging what I’m tasting. Medium finish. Final notes : Loads of smoke output and flavor. Got more medium+ towards halfway point. Can’t feel any nicotine at the halfway, so I’ll put that at either light or light+ for strength. Flavors got a bit bolder towards the end. Mineral flavor became a little brighter and mouth feel got a bit drier. Finish has moved towards upper back of my throat. Retrohale has been smooth as silk. Not a grain of pepper to be found. Burn was pretty decent, only requiring one touch up. Strength definitely picked up towards the end, feeling a nice N buzz. Slight blow out last 3rd, perhaps due to outside conditions and lack of dry boxing. Smoke time : 50 minutes Score : I enjoyed this smoke immensely, although perhaps not quite as much as a really good Parti Short. 8 out of 10 — a definite keeper in the rotation, especially when I want a short strong smoke.
  18. captain

    Padrón Dámaso

    When they first came out they were pretty good..the newer ones are really loose, muted and crummy....done with them
  19. devildoge9

    24:24 MONDAY

    they get better with age folks... at those prices, put one of each away and revisit them in a couple years, you'll be glad you did.
  20. This is good value as well. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  21. MIKA27

    FORMULA 1

    Why we love... the Monaco Grand Prix We’ve visited some great tracks already this season, but there’s always something a little bit special about the Monaco Grand Prix. Here's why we love going racing in Monte Carlo… 1. It looks incredible Even just one Formula 1 car making its way around the streets of Monaco is a sight to behold. From sweeping past the Hotel de Paris and the Casino, to blasting through the tunnel and then following the line of the spectacular harbour, it really is a stunning location for a race. When you put 20 cars on track at once, it gets even better. Everywhere around the circuit, fans can get so close to the cars, while the cameras can similarly be inches away from the action as the drivers thread their way between the barriers. An F1 car might not be able to hit top speeds or corner at its absolute fastest in Monaco, but the close vicinity of the walls and narrow width of the track just heighten the sense of speed and offer up a relentless challenge for the drivers, with no time to rest. And it’s all set against some backdrop, with the Principality stretching up above the circuit and a harbour that is filled with luxury yachts. It’s fantasy stuff that feels like it would never be approved now, which just makes it all the more special. 2. The driver makes a difference It’s true that the difficulty overtaking in Monaco can often lead to processional races, but to call it boring would do a disservice to the driver skill on show just to keep the car out of the barriers. Even more so with the wide cars we currently have, there is so little room for error. So much of the circuit requires commitment, and in certain areas that even means the drivers pointing the car at the barrier on the inside of the track in the belief that it will understeer and miss the Armco. Confidence is essential around Monaco, and without it you’re going to find yourself off the pace. While car performance still plays a role, this is one of those venues where a driver can still make a significant difference. Especially in qualifying, if a driver is committed, comfortable with their car and willing to take a few risks, the potential is there to exceed where the machinery would usually be on other circuits. The flipside of that is it only takes a second to make a mistake. No matter how quick you are, and even if your car is performing well, if you make the slightest error it’s likely to result in damage, or at least contact with a barrier that will cost significant lap time. And if you’re out of position in Monte Carlo, it’s so hard to make up for it. 3. So many of the greats have won here Another reason Monaco is so iconic is because so many of the greatest names have successfully risen to the test. When you think of past Monaco races, you think of Ayrton Senna’s record of six wins, of his sublime qualifying performance in 1988 (even though that didn’t result in another victory), and of Michael Schumacher matching Graham Hill with five victories. Alain Prost, Jackie Stewart, Juan Manuel Fangio, Niki Lauda, Fernando Alonso, Lewis Hamilton, Sebastian Vettel – they are all multiple world champions who were multiple winners on the street circuit. The records of so many greats – both past and present – in Monaco just add to the prestige of winning the race. But that doesn’t mean it cannot throw up surprises from time to time. Jim Clark was one of the greatest in the sport’s history but never won around Monaco, while 1996 saw Olivier Panis take a shock win in a Ligier as just four cars were still running at the chequered flag. 4. It starts a day early Now, don’t forget to set yourself a reminder, because if you’re on autopilot and tune in on Friday to watch free practice, you’re going to be disappointed. That’s because the Monaco Grand Prix weekend starts a day earlier than any other event, with media day on Wednesday and the first two free practice sessions on Thursday. Friday is a day off when it comes to Formula 1 track action, which adds suspense in terms of trying to get everything right for qualifying, as the drivers have to wait an extra 24 hours to see if their changes after FP2 have had the desired effect. But then they do get some more time to attend some of the glamorous events taking place around the Principality, so I’m sure they’re delighted about that… It does take the pressure off the teams somewhat in terms of preparing for Saturday’s running, but racing is still going on as the Formula 2 feature race takes centre stage on Friday. One of the backstories to the Thursday practice centres around a local market taking place on the Friday in the past, but however the tradition originated it’s simply an extra day to see cars running on track, so what’s not to love? 5. It’s the place people want to be seen We’ve already referenced some of the spectacular yachts that are moored in the harbour during the race weekend, and quite often they will house some of the biggest celebrities. As a race that features numerous high-end events around it, the Monaco Grand Prix is the place to be seen for A-listers. The grid is always packed with elite athletes, film stars, artists, models, designers and so many more, all keen to be part of one of the most glamorous weekends on the sporting calendar. But it’s not only an event that caters to the rich and famous. Sure, if you attend as a fan you probably wouldn’t mind a bit of extra spending money, but the track itself opens up on every single evening during the race weekend, with the final sector closed to traffic as it essentially becomes one big dance floor for all of the bars that line the circuit from the Swimming Pool to Rascasse.
  22. I get the root beer taste off an Illusione cigar. Great flavor. What is this "smashing" technique you speak of?
  23. MIKA27

    FORMULA 1

    THE DEBATE: Are Mercedes the greatest team in Formula 1 history? Mercedes have begun the 2019 Formula 1 campaign in breathtakingly brilliant fashion. Not only have they won all five races, but they've backed each of those victories up with a second place, too. It's an extraordinary feat which has not only led to many asking if they can go the entire season unbeaten, but also whether this Silver Arrows operation is the best ever. F1 digital presenter Will Buxton and F1 senior writer Lawrence Barretto discuss... WILL BUXTON - YES We always say it is a folly to try and compare racers from rival eras, so vastly different were the circumstances under which they raced. So to try and do so with the teams which have competed in the many and varied eras of Formula 1 may also prove to be equally as difficult. And yet I cannot think of another outfit which has not only so utterly dominated their opposition, but which have consistently raised the level of what we accept to be the norm in the history of Formula 1. Since the start of the hybrid era in 2014, Mercedes have won (post Barcelona 2019) 75% of the races contested. They have won every drivers’ and constructors’ title, matching Ferrari and Michael Schumacher’s run from 2000 to 2004. Should they win the constructors’ crown again this season they will match Ferrari’s six titles in a row. If either of their drivers wins the crown they will do what has never been done and take six doubles in a row. Ferrari may have been so dominant that they won the 2002 world championship at the French Grand Prix in July, but even they only managed a win rate of 66% in their five-year run of doubles. McLaren’s four-year run of doubles from ‘88-‘91 saw a 59% win ratio. Red Bull’s four doubles? 53%. But it’s not just about win percentages. Under the hybrid regulations, Mercedes have been at the forefront and never bettered in their development of the power unit. As far back as 2017 their engine hit over 50% thermal efficiency on the bench, reflecting one of the largest steps in one of the shortest periods in the history of the internal combustion engine. One of the defining pieces of technology of our lifetime has been evolved faster and further than at any time in its history thanks to the path this team have taken. But they have struggled at times with aero, tyres, strategy and even engine reliability. Yet they have used those moments as inspiration to better themselves, their creativity, their ingenuity and their workload. If they have found themselves a step behind they have not stopped until they are two ahead. And even then to focus on making it three steps. They are relentless. Seemingly unstoppable. A well-oiled machine created with just one purpose – winning. “The best, or nothing” is the company’s mantra and it seems to have permeated every level of the operation. And yet it remains human and warm. The team is not perfect. It makes mistakes. And when it does so it puts up its hands and finds out why. If success breeds confidence and confidence breeds success, Mercedes have found the perfect harmony to place themselves in a whirlwind of brilliance. Even a deep-seated animosity between their lead drivers to rival any of the rivalries seen in this sport could not halt their trajectory. As with everything, it was dealt with calmly, fairly and swiftly. Should we decry their achievements or their passion to continually better themselves? Or should we applaud the level of excellence their workmanship has created not only within the walls of their own team, but in every garage the length of the pit lane whose stated purpose and very existence is focused on toppling them from their throne? Take a step back and appreciate the greatest team in Formula 1 history while you still can. You’re watching them make history. LAWRENCE BARRETTO - NOT JUST YET What Mercedes have achieved since the start of the V6 hybrid era is astonishing. Five seasons, 10 championships. In the last five years, they won nearly 75% of the races. In 2019, they are unbeaten having scored five successive one-two finishes. Those are some killer stats. They are undoubtedly one of the greatest teams in the history of the championship - operationally, they are the best ever - but they are not the greatest yet. That accolade, in my opinion, lies with Ferrari, following their brilliant run of five successive championship doubles from 2000 to 2004. I rate that performance higher simply because they had stronger competition. Mercedes have essentially had it their own way during their period of dominance. Sure, Ferrari offered a threat in the last two seasons, but it was never sustained and always tailed off when the flyaways started in the second half of the campaign. Not once have we had a title decider between two different teams during that period. For Ferrari, it’s true that they were utterly dominant in 2002 and 2004, Michael Schumacher wrapping up the title as early as the French Grand Prix in July in the latter with his ninth win in 10 races. But 2000 and 2003 were competitive. In 2003, for example, Schumacher clinched the title by just two points. Mercedes have also made the most of the major engine regulation change ahead of 2014, which gave them a huge advantage over the rest of the pack. Of course, the job they did to achieve such a feat was mightly impressive, but it reduced the competition on track. While the rest of the pack have closed, they have upped their game consistently – making the most of having that advantage and allowing them to enhance an already strong product while also giving them scope to put resources into forward planning while others were throwing everything into simply catching up. That said, if Mercedes continue on their current trajectory, with the team operating at such a high level and producing a car, which this year Lewis Hamilton says is the team’s best ever, it’s hard to see how they won’t become the greatest ever in the very near future. If they keep winning at this rate, and wrap up a sixth consecutive double – something no team in F1 history has ever achieved – it starts to become very hard to deny them the accolade…
  24. i do know what you mean but surely a $100 can possibly provide far better value than a $10 wine. had a 97 pertimali brunello at a brunello tasting lunch on saturday - been in my cellar for years. probably only cost me $30 or $40 when released, may be less. i've had $1000 bottles of brunello that have been brilliant, but none got close to this. today, the current release would be over $100 (i'm guessing between $90 and $150 - no real idea) but if it is as good as this then i'd suggest the value it offers is near unmatchable (is that a word?) but i know what you mean.
  25. MIKA27

    FORMULA 1

    Bottas: Every opportunity key to beating Hamilton in 2019 Valterri Bottas got to witness both the plusses and minuses of being Lewis Hamilton’s team mate at the Spanish Grand Prix, winning plaudits for his awesome pole lap that saw him trounce Hamilton by a full 0.634s on Saturday, before being forced to play second best to a stunning race drive from Hamilton on Sunday. A problem with his clutch at the start of the race, Bottas suggested, effectively handed victory to Hamilton, as the Finn had to slot into a second place that he’d never relinquish after the first three corners, as Hamilton pounded off into the distance. And with the chance of the 2019 drivers’ title being fought out exclusively between Bottas and Hamilton looking increasingly likely, after the pair’s fifth straight one-two of the year in Spain, Bottas was all too aware that, upon such things as poor getaways, championships can turn. “For now, [the title battle is] between me and Lewis, but it's massively long season,” said Bottas, when asked whether he expected an all-Mercedes scrap for the drivers’ championship in 2019. “There’s many teams that, especially at some tracks, are very close and it's going to be a big development race between teams all through the season. “But if it's going to be me and Lewis, every single opportunity is going to be key. That's why [the race in Spain] for me was annoying. I felt I worked hard for this weekend and for the qualifying… to be on pole, on this circuit where it means a lot and I lost it at the start. But that’s life and there's 16 opportunities to go. That's plenty. I look forward to it, Monaco next and we'll see.” As Bottas mentions, Formula 1’s next stop will be in the famous Principality. Mercedes, with their long-wheelbase, low-rake philosophy, have tended to struggle at Monaco in recent years relative to rivals Red Bull and Ferrari. But with the team having shown devastating pace through Barcelona’s corner-heavy Sector 3 complex, Bottas is hopeful that the 2019 Monaco Grand Prix will give him an immediate chance to hit back at Hamilton – and secure at the very least his first podium appearance in Monte Carlo. “I feel I've never in my Formula 1 career I've never had a good car in Monaco,” said Bottas. “It's such a unique track, you need a very special car in terms of how it works mechanically in Monaco, with all the warps and bumps, so it's a question mark how we're going to perform there. “But obviously from Barcelona here, Sector 3 with slow corners, it's promising… I would just hope that we have a good car there because it would be such a unique race to be fighting for the win, or win it. I've actually never been on the podium there so it's something I really look forward to. I'll definitely focus 100% of the weekend for the qualifying performance and being absolutely on it in Qualifying 3, like here. “I live just next to the start-finish line,” he added, “so it would be nice to have a good car there…” Hamilton’s victory in Spain means that he now sits seven points clear of Bottas in the drivers’ standings, with Bottas himself a full 39 up on third-placed Max Verstappen.
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