JohnS

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About JohnS

  • Rank
    El Partidario
  • Birthday 06/08/1972

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  • Location
    Sydney, Australia

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  1. JohnS

    FOH'ers Daily Smoke

    Congratulations!
  2. 2006. Hence, the Montecristo A is the last gran corona vitola (47 ring gauge x 235 mm).
  3. It's more likely that the Montecristo A is in a current production hiatus. As we know, Habanos S.A. has streamlined their regular production catalogue drastically in the last 15 to 20 years, yet no Cohiba or Montecristo regular production cigar has been discontinued this century.
  4. I have an affinity with the Cohiba Siglo VI, Partagas Lusitanias and Montecristo No.2 as invariably I find I really enjoy them from my humidor, conservatively speaking, nine times out of ten (I would consume the Montecristo No.2 the most out of these). The respective Gran Reservas of these cigars I enjoyed doesn't compare...trust me, it's a whole other category.
  5. JohnS

    JohnS' Smoking Diary 2019

    Thank you kindly, @Chef. I will keep the reviews coming.
  6. JohnS

    JohnS' Smoking Diary 2019

    Por Larrañaga Montecarlos LGR Abr 2018 (thanks @Luca!) Gifted by @Luca (thank you), this darker-wrappered Por Larranaga Montecarlos was intended to allow me to make a comparison to the lighter-wrappered LGR Oct 2017 Por Larranaga Montecarlos box I've been going through at the moment. In general, I must concede that I prefer lighter-wrappered Habanos cigars where possible. This is because of my preference for milder (flavoured) smoking experiences. This is just my general rule and they are exceptions to the rule, both in terms of smoking experiences and preferences across marcas and vitolas. In relation to Por Larranaga Montecarlos, I find darker-wrappered varieties tend to be more dominant in wood and spice and lighter-wrappered varieties tend to be more dominant in caramel, or just sweeter and less woody. This was the case with this cigar. It certainly had caramel, but it was more woody than my LGR Oct 17 recent PLM's and had a little spice to it too, although it wasn't 'toasty' in any way. When they are like this I'm prone to rest them until the wood and spice recedes and the blend builds in caramel more. When that occurs is a matter of personal judgement through checking on the box periodically, perhaps every 3 to 6 months as a minimum. In the meantime, I still enjoyed this cigar and appreciated its blend of flavours.
  7. JohnS

    JohnS' Smoking Diary 2019

    Cohiba Siglo VI circa 2006 (thanks @Trevor2118!) The final years of my Secondary Education saw me introduced to the subject of Economics. The etymology of the word itself is interesting, in Ancient Greek it means "the law or rule of (managing) the house". I learnt some interesting things about demand and supply curves, stagflation, principles of economic growth and elastic and inelastic demand. It's this last topic which I'm convinced Habanos S.A knows too well when it comes to pricing their cigars for the market. You see, 30 years ago my teacher told me that something like a yo-yo will lose demand if the price goes up (elastic demand), whereas staple dietary items such as bread and milk will still be demanded in equal numbers despite price changes (inelastic demand). Such knowledge now makes me understand the current pricing of the Cohiba Behike line and the Cohiba Siglo VI in comparison to the Siglo I, II, III, IV and V. The moral of this story? God help you if your staple 'go-to' cigar is currently the Siglo VI. Introduced in 2002 as an addition to the Siglo line which came out in 1992, I always found the Siglo VI just a little different in comparison to the others in terms of its blend. For me, there's always a little more mocha coffee and butter notes to them. The aged Siglo VI from 2006 was gifted to me by Trevor (much, much thanks dear friend!) and it did not disappoint when it came to butter in any way! This was similar to my recent 2018 Cohiba Esplendidos in regards to construction. Ash was always a minimum one-inch length and the burn was perfect. There was no need for re-lights. The cigar was butter-laden from the beginning and did not let up. Other flavours included mocha coffee, Cohiba Grass/hay and some honey and a little vanilla. There was a little spice on the retrohale, more-so in the back half. The smoke output was more voluminous than your average cigar which allowed for a lot more flavour per draw and subsequently made me smoke it slower. In conclusion, at 13 years of age this cigar was spot on. It makes it difficult for me to want to smoke my other Siglo VI stock that is currently under 5 years of age when this one was so good over ten (years of age).
  8. JohnS

    JohnS' Smoking Diary 2019

    Cohiba Espléndidos MOL Jul 2018 I think I've been fortunate to enjoy a few Cohiba Esplendidos in the last 12 months. Nearly all of them have been quite good, but I don't think any were as good as this. This Esplendidos, at just under 12 months of age, was exemplary in both flavour delivery and construction in every way. First of all, the cigar was beautifully balanced in flavours, no flavours stood out from the other. Mocha coffee, Cohiba grass/hay, honey and butter...it was all there but curiously those flavours weren't distinctive as much as they were finely melded into one and stayed that way consistently from beginning to end, like what you may expect from an older Esplendidos. Secondly, I don't remember ashing and each ash-length was at least an inch or more. Sometimes tapping the ash slightly was ineffective in dropping it...I knew this was a sign of quality construction. The burn was always straight and it didn't burn too quickly or slowly, held my attention throughout and made me feel ambiguous at end after nubbing as far as I could go. After the final puff I was grateful for finishing the night with such an amazing cigar. yet lamented it ending. If only all my Habanos cigars were this good...if only!
  9. JohnS

    JohnS' Smoking Diary 2019

    Montecristo No.2 GOS Ago 2018 If you've been around our forum awhile invariably a number of topics will come up from time-to-time. One of these is the preference for darker or lighter wrappers for certain marcas and/or vitolas. A few months ago El Pres was able to pick out some quality Montecristo No 2's in dark and light wrappers and list these boxes on 24:24. I went for the lighter option. In my experience, I find the lighter-wrappered Monte 2's more approachable in their youth and more dominant in nut and citrus twang. I tend to find darker Monte 2's need more time for me (around 3 to 5 years) and more dominant in strong cocoa/chocolate and coffee flavours. Since cigar smoking is highly subjective and experiences differ amongst enthusiasts, this is just my generalisation in regards to wrapper colour and Monte 2's, if yours is different that's fine. This Montecristo No.2 was exactly as I envisaged in terms of delivering wonderful notes of almond nut, orange citrus twang, light milk coffee and cocoa and was just above mild in strength, which is amazing really, as the cigar is only eight months old. At this rate, I don't think the box will last out the year until I finish them!
  10. JohnS

    FOH'ers Daily Smoke

    Por Larrañaga Montecarlos LGR Abr 2018 (thanks @Luca!) Gifted by @Luca (thank you), this darker-wrappered Por Larranaga Montecarlos was intended to allow me to make a comparison to the lighter-wrappered LGR Oct 2017 Por Larranaga Montecarlos box I've been going through at the moment. In general, I must concede that I prefer lighter-wrappered Habanos cigars where possible. This is because of my preference for milder (flavoured) smoking experiences. This is just my general rule and they are exceptions to the rule, both in terms of smoking experiences and preferences across marcas and vitolas. In relation to Por Larranaga Montecarlos, I find darker-wrappered varieties tend to be more dominant in wood and spice and lighter-wrappered varieties tend to be more dominant in caramel, or just sweeter and less woody. This was the case with this cigar. It certainly had caramel, but it was more woody than my LGR Oct 17 recent PLM's and had a little spice to it too, although it wasn't 'toasty' in any way. When they are like this I'm prone to rest them until the wood and spice recedes and the blend builds in caramel more. When that occurs is a matter of personal judgement through checking on the box periodically, perhaps every 3 to 6 months as a minimum. In the meantime, I still enjoyed this cigar and appreciated its blend of flavours.
  11. JohnS

    FOH'ers Daily Smoke

    Cohiba Siglo VI circa 2006 (thanks @Trevor2118!) The final years of my Secondary Education saw me introduced to the subject of Economics. The etymology of the word itself is interesting, in Ancient Greek it means "the law or rule of (managing) the house". I learnt some interesting things about demand and supply curves, stagflation, principles of economic growth and elastic and inelastic demand. It's this last topic which I'm convinced Habanos S.A knows too well when it comes to pricing their cigars for the market. You see, 30 years ago my teacher told me that something like a yo-yo will lose demand if the price goes up (elastic demand), whereas staple dietary items such as bread and milk will still be demanded in equal numbers despite price changes (inelastic demand). Such knowledge now makes me understand the current pricing of the Cohiba Behike line and the Cohiba Siglo VI in comparison to the Siglo I, II, III, IV and V. The moral of this story? God help you if your staple 'go-to' cigar is currently the Siglo VI. Introduced in 2002 as an addition to the Siglo line which came out in 1992, I always found the Siglo VI just a little different in comparison to the others in terms of its blend. For me, there's always a little more mocha coffee and butter notes to them. The aged Siglo VI from 2006 was gifted to me by Trevor (much, much thanks dear friend!) and it did not disappoint when it came to butter in any way! This was similar to my recent 2018 Cohiba Esplendidos in regards to construction. Ash was always a minimum one-inch length and the burn was perfect. There was no need for re-lights. The cigar was butter-laden from the beginning and did not let up. Other flavours included mocha coffee, Cohiba Grass/hay and some honey and a little vanilla. There was a little spice on the retrohale, more-so in the back half. The smoke output was more voluminous than your average cigar which allowed for a lot more flavour per draw and subsequently made me smoke it slower. In conclusion, at 13 years of age this cigar was spot on. It makes it difficult for me to want to smoke my other Siglo VI stock that is currently under 5 years of age when this one was so good over ten (years of age).
  12. JohnS

    2019 PGA Championship Predictions

    That was the '96 Masters and I remember it like yesterday. Yes, heartbreaking for Norman and no, he never was the same again. He was 43 by the time he succumbed to injuries in 1998 but the seed was sown way back in 86/87 when Bob Tway holed in from the bunker in the PGA championship on the 18th and Larry Mize chipped in from 45 yards to win the Masters in a playoff. So Greg Norman won 2 British Opens but came second in Major Championships 7 times. He should have won more, but I still think of him as every bit a great golfer as Nick Faldo. He wisely forego the Seniors Circuit in 2005 (when he turned 50) and concentrated on his hugely successful business empire.
  13. JohnS

    2019 PGA Championship Predictions

    Wow, after two rounds I think Brooks Koepka can only lose this as no-one will catch him otherwise. By the way, am I missing something? The US PGA was traditionally played in August as the last of the 4 majors in a season but this year was moved to May after the Masters and before the US Open? What brought this about?
  14. JohnS

    australian sport

    Well, on a brighter note...Jack de Belin lost his case against the NRL over being stood down this year as he is currently (criminally) charged with aggravated sexual assault. As he is 28 years old and it could take 2 years to resolve the matter his career in Rugby League could be over. Personally, I welcome such news because I'm frankly sick to death of numerous incidents of Rugby League players (in the past 10 or 15 years) committing such acts of violence against their wives/partners or girlfriends. On a less brighter note, Dylan Walker, who plays for Manly, is allowed to play this weekend because his case of domestic violence against his partner was thrown out on a technicality. The police were so upset about it that they took the extraordinary measure of publishing photos via the media of his partner after he attacked her in the off-season this year for interrupting him playing a video game. Like in the Greg Bird case (what a disgusting vile human piece of trash...seriously, glassing your girlfriend and dealing cocaine amongst 'teammates' for the Gold Coast Titans, again not convicted on technicalities) the partner doesn't testify so they are allowed to play sport in the public realm. I don't blame the NRL for finally taking a stand on this continued behaviour but they have themselves to blame for it. As for Rugby Australia, getting rid of Israel Folau will ultimately result in a further drawn out legislative process where they will both lose the case for dismissing Folau on the grounds they've stated and it will cost them millions (there are laws in Australia protecting against workplace dismissal on religious grounds. I think Rugby Australia will have a hard time proving that they've done otherwise). I don't think I have enough breath to draw in regards to Kyrgios. At least Tomic has disappeared for the time being.

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