NapaNolan

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About NapaNolan

  • Rank
    Campanas
  • Birthday 05/21/1986

Profile Information

  • Location
    Willamette Valley (not in Napa anymore)
  • Interests
    Wine, music, good food

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2,025 profile views
  1. I’m not terribly active here lately, but this is a topic I’ll chime in on! I make wine professionally but last year made a few gallons of something for myself, dipping my toes into a very specific type of wine (Auslese-style Riesling) to see if I may want to start my own label some day. Turning it professional will be years off if it happens but my first try is absolutely delicious and I’m doubling my fruit source for this year.
  2. Currently McMinnville, perhaps a little closer in by the end of the year.
  3. @Fugu what kind of grapes you got growing there? You look pretty far behind the ripening schedule for any major wine region (except maybe Finger Lakes?).
  4. Easttide, many European wine laws restrict producers to using only natural corks. Many regions also have laws dictating what bottle shapes can and can't be used, and even what color glass. These laws arent always logical or backed by any science or data. I can't quote laws specifically but I doubt you'll find a Barolo (or many high quality Italian wines) under screwcap.
  5. For a group of guys that don't mind spending $10+ on a cigar, my advice is don't skimp on wine. An an empty bottle costs $1, the box it comes in costs $1, the cork or screw cap can be $0.50-$1, the labels and capsules cost money. If a bottle costs $5, there's something wrong with it, or there was something wrong with it and it was reverse engineered and sold cheap on the bulk wine market. <$10 wines are usually loaded with flavor and texture enhancers, preservatives, sweeteners, coloring agents, oak and tannin powder...not to mention all of the cheap wines that tes
  6. Roasted almonds Coarse salt to taste Top notch olive oil to taste Try stopping halfway through a bowl.
  7. I bought a 10 box maybe 8 years ago. I think I only recently threw away the box so unfortunately I couldn't tell you the box code.
  8. Well you can track the blend based on the disgorgement date, using it like a lot number or a serial number. I think I'm answering the question?
  9. Ken, blends vary wildly by disgorgement dates with Pierre Peters. Some have been single-vintage while most are multi-vintage.
  10. I can think of a few jokes but can't decide on just one...
  11. The golden standard to me is Pierre Peters. The basic Cuvee de Reserve is wonderful stuff. Blanc de Blancs, Les Mesnil-sur-Oger. Some disgorgement dates are better than others, a quick google should point to the better ones. They do a vintage Les Chetillons that is wonderful, too. More in a clean, light, racy style with bright acidity. With a different style, a bit richer and a good table mate to Dom Perignon would be Gaston Chiquet. Their basic Brut (olive green label) is really good. They do a few others bottlings, Blanc de Blancs, Special Club... but they're all good. Both of thes

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