Philc2001

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About Philc2001

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  • Birthday December 29

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    Cone of Death
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    Family, Investing, Stock Picking, Fine Cigars, Scotch, Computers, Blogging, Travel, Cars... too many vises!

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  1. I am convinced the LCDH in several Mexico tourist areas, and for that matter on any Carib. islands, are almost all fakes. Any non LCDH merchants, or any of the folks walking around with cigars on any of the Carib islands are guaranteed to be 100% fake. in fact, any cigar shops around the world selling CCs except Spain, France and Switzerland I would be very suspicious, and even then I would stick to reputable merchants. There are some LCDH shops in some of the duty free zones that may be legit, but few and far between.
  2. If you're offered CCs on the streets in Cuba, or in Miami, either on the streets or in cigar shop, I am 100% certain they are fakes. The island fakes probably have some Cuban tobacco, though. The fakes you typically find around Miami are often real tobacco, probably Nic or Hond tobacco. I haven't had any of these in many years, but virtually all the ones I tasted over the years were crap, very peppery and harsh as I recall. Some fakes I had decades ago, or at least what I believed to be fakes, were damn good cigars, I wish I had been able to get box loads. Most of these were brought back
  3. Unfortunately, I don't think this will fly. But, it is a pretty good attempt to work around the stupidity of the embargo that has been a failure for 60+ years. It is unfortunate that the whole thing has become a political football. Now it is all about swaying the older Cuban/American voters in Miami. However if by some miracle it gets passed, then the next hurdle would be to overcome the Cuban gov't, who will not doubt have financial incentives to stop any farmers from growing tobacco for export, unless of course they send all proceeds to the communist government directly.... lol.
  4. 2005 Partagas P2, smooth, medium bodied smoke, slightly spicy.
  5. By the same measure, aren't you assuming that nothing was learned from this experience that can be applied to the next pandemic outbreak? I agree there will undoubtedly be some degree of variability, but the spread of a pandemic is somewhat predictable. Where transmission is person to person, the pattern can be modeled. The playbook may be slightly different depending on the origin and the severity, etc. but slowing down the spread of a pandemic has an established protocol. Do you think China, Taiwan, HK, etc. learned nothing useful from SARS, bird flu, swine flu, etc. that influenc
  6. I think we are in agreement. But wasn't that always the objective? It seemed abundantly clear, to me at least, that social distancing and masking were temporary, just buying time, until a cure or vaccine could be developed and administered. Taiwan and others prioritized and responded effectively. I don't think anyone assumes that distancing and masking was a 100% solution, but I think there is enough real world evidence and observations to prove they are effective at slowing down the spread and minimizing the death toll. I don't know how anyone can argue that it didn't. And it was
  7. So it seems, I can't follow the logic... either 100% compliance, or don't even bother. Much as we wish for universal and coordinated behavior, countries like China, Taiwan, New Zealand, Australia and others that reacted quickly and early were much more successful. That is real the world.
  8. The virus is known to be airborne, transmitted by respiratory particles expelled into the air by someone who is infected. Viral particles from another person's respiratory output that is inhaled by another person increases the risk of infecting that person. I think this much is proven fact. The article uses a quantitative model based on the abundance of airborne respiratory virus in the air. Think of it in measurable terms such as parts per billion, the amount of virus particles in a given volume of air. It is a pretty straight forward model where the amount of airborne virus (viral load)
  9. There was a fair bit of dialog in here about the effectiveness of masks and whether they make any difference, or if they provide any kind of measurable protection. I hear a lot of anecdotes and opinions, but very few well documented or researched perspectives. Well, a friend forwarded this Science article to me, and it gave me a new perspective. Read for yourself. Here is the abstract for the article, followed by a link to the full article; https://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2021/05/19/science.abg6296.full
  10. I actually wish they would get all their boxes and packaging made in China, then they would at least look as professional as most NCs. I forgot to add; and they would probably cost less too.
  11. My wife and I never get the flu vaccine, but her mom gets vaccinated every year, religiously. And yet without fail, we never get the flu but her mother gets the flu every single winter, despite being vaccinated. We live in a tropical climate though, and her mom lives in the North East, so weather is probably a factor. There is no way of knowing what strain of flu she gets, or whether she was vaxxed against that strain or not. However, her symptoms are usually relatively mild and pass within a few days, so maybe the vax is doing something for her, I don't know. Her mom's husband works in r
  12. I anticipate companies will continue to build momentum towards vaccination... https://www.local10.com/news/2021/05/14/new-hires-in-airline-industry-may-face-strict-covid-19-vaccine-policies/ Delta Airlines is now requiring all new employees to get the COVID-19 vaccine, but that’s not the case for existing employees. The cruise line industry is also requiring vaccination, although they had several health related problems well before COVID; https://abc7ny.com/cdc-cruise-ships-cruises-covid-vaccine-curise-lines-2021/10559989/ The CDC clarified its existing return-t
  13. I think these are somewhat exaggerated urban legends. But, there are some rational reasons for treating every case that comes into the hospital as a covid infected victim. Until this pandemic is overcome, first responders and medical workers cannot take an chances, they have to assume every patient they see is infectious. They spend their entire shift in a bubble of PPE, and have to take every precaution possible including changing their PPE between every patient they visit. It's not a pleasant environment to be in, constantly behind a mask for 8-12 hours, and covered in PPE head to toe every
  14. The dilemma, it seems to me, is that getting vaccinated is as much a personal choice as it is a global security concern. Given the mortality rate, the infectious nature of the virus, and no known medical treatments for the disease, It is difficult to separate oneself from the big picture and look at it strictly as a personal choice. The disease is communicable through the air, it has reached every corner on earth, and it is fatal. The moment you come within breathing distance of anyone else, there is risk of transmission, and potentially hastening someone's death. So unless you can remai
  15. I think the tipping point will be driven by social and economic pressure. Some employers are already making it a condition of employment, and as the economy opens up and remote workers get recalled back, I think corporations will have to mandate it. My employer started opening up the office to vaxxed associates in late April. It is still voluntary to go back into the office, but for how long I cannot tell. I suspect there will be an end when it will be required to both be vaxxed and go back to the office. Schools are requiring it too, although it was already mandatory to be vaccinate

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