SaintMickey®

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Everything posted by SaintMickey®

  1. Going to be in the very very very Cigar Friendly Key West for 5 days starting tomorrow 05/26.... Better odds than other cities that a FOH'r could be also...Just checking.
  2. Its a new class...just below Clearance, "FKTARDS" Get 'em while their hot!
  3. Left Wrist facing out as designed. Knowing how my bracelet/clasp looks from keyboards etc I can not imagine what it would do to my crystal/bezel etc. A bracelet can be brushed at service to be made to look new...
  4. That orange bolt doesn't bother me as much as the over-sizing and changing of some models. I like 40mm size...for a watch on a bracelet. I guess I like things more "classic". I tried on a Breitling in Vegas that I would have to wear on my LEG so it looked proportionate...and I ain't small!
  5. I like these...been actually hunting a white dial one. Fairly reasonable.
  6. I understand this. I do not like their new bigger flashier versions either really. I like two and I own them. The Anniversary Sub was one of the last case sizes before they got bigger and shinier and the original Explorer II almost isn't recognized by many as even a Rolex. That model is a prime example of them ruining a classic look...got bigger, got flashier, big orange hand on the dial...which they would have stayed more "classic". To your other point...definitely don't need them to tell time now a days! But not to be silly and bring every thing back to cigars but...if you could have a vaporizer that gave you the same smoke, flavor, buzz whatever that a cigar does for us would we give up cigars? To me that is what I think when people say "I don't need a wristwatch I got the time right here.." and they show me their iPhone. Not the same...
  7. Agreed Tudor is a great alternative. I have the new release of the Tudor Ranger. Great watch for the money. Curious what you "hate" about the Rolex brand? They are responsible for Tudor so they can't be THAT bad!
  8. And then there is El Hoze..with his one watch worth more than my entire collection!
  9. @rhcolbert I just checked my paper work and I paid $3650 about 3-4 years ago for mine used. Although I got Box and warranty paper are nice but don't mean anything since its out of warranty. Might get $40 more if I ever sold. I did buy my Omega Speedmaster and Submariner new so I like the box and paper on those as it has my name...my son will get them all. The second picture is of a fake Breitling looking watch. Bought two of them and they never left the house! LOL that was years ago. Until recently my itch was not scratched because I just bought the Breitling Cosmonaut pristine used. @Ginseng I bet your itch won't be scratched either until you buy Rolex GMT II...and let me tell you it feels good!
  10. I am sorry to say but I also agree this is "fraud". If you want a non Rolex then by all means buy one but don't buy a look a like. I've never seen the watch you posted but yikes...that is a complete copy. Would you smoke a fake Cuban cigar and say "but it looks the same"? LOL I can't tell you the times I've sat next to a guy on a plane and noticed his watch and then I noticed it was a Folex...I just cringe. And remember I would not cringe if he had on a Seiko or a Timex...its not about "cost". I tried to buy "alternatives" but always found myself flipping or giving them away. My advise unless it is just not possible wait and buy a Rolex GMT II if that is what you really want. They can be had a lot more reasonably used. I prefer the "older" cases before Rolex beefed them up but that is just me. I like the Rolex Explorer II for a GMT as well...bought my M series used a couple years ago for about $4k...they are still out there. If bought smart you will not lose money and/or you will hand down to someone a nice watch that will increase in value for sure. I could flip my watches and make money on everyone of them. Good luck in your decision.
  11. San Francisco May 1, Napa May 2, San Francisco May 3...any haunts you can recommend would be appreciated. I'm finding some places on line in Napa but you all must know best...!
  12. The flavor, the ritual, the enjoyment, the relaxation, the solitude, the friends...but ultimately its the flavor because if the cigars tasted bad I wouldn't smoke them.
  13. I knew someone who who was here for like 12 years before they posted! Welcome.
  14. @PigFish Just to be clear that's what they sent me. Your quoting it like I personally said it. And I agree WTF. Glad to get the word out on these over priced POS.
  15. Others can chime in but I don't believe this type of unit produces too much moisture. I wish it did that would mean it would have a condenser and freon and I wouldn't have my temperature problem!!! Let me also add I've been running this sucker nonstop since November with an oasis XL and never had high moisture.
  16. Understood...been working since November filled-up the same as now...my cigar heat pump just sucks.
  17. So its getting warm in the South but no worries I have a New Air Cooler. AH well maybe... I had the vent closed in this downstairs room so when the heat came on the room stayed cool during the winter. It is what the wife calls "the cigar room". Came home today and although the a/c turned on that room also didn't get any a/c because the vent is closed. My unit was not able to maintain 65 degrees. I called Air-N-Water ( and the point of this post) and found out that if a room gets near 80 the unit "isn't going to work that well" or maintain the temperature I desire. The brochure says if your near 80 you won't maintain 55...I can't maintain below 70. Here is where I admit my ignorance...I had no idea there was not a compressor and all these kept the inside cooler with was a fan (what they call a cooling kit". Basically I have a Cigar Heat Pump! Just sharing this in case anyone didn't know or like me expected this to keep cool in a "warmer room" . I am sure many might want to use these in a garage or shed man cave. Be careful. I will open the vent and cool the room but not what I thought I bought. Also it makes the price I paid, even at 50% off at Christmas, too much for what it is. They sent me info below in the meantime. Also they are sending me a new "cooling unit" (fan) to see if that helps. I hope this helps someone in the future... How Thermoelectric Coolers Work If you've been shopping for a wine cooler or wine chiller to house your growing collection of fine wines, you have probably discovered two distinct types: compressor and thermoelectric. While these coolers may look the same on the outside, there is a world of difference in how they operate. If you're going to invest a few hundred dollars or more in an appliance for your home, it's a good idea to know about the technology you're paying for. A compressor wine cooler operates just like the refrigerator in your kitchen. A liquid refrigerant (Freon) circulates through a compressor system that produces cold air inside the refrigerator and expels hot air externally. The advantage of this kind of this cooling is that it can reach very cold temperatures - our AWC-330E units can cool down to 39°F, which is great not only for chilling white wines but also for keeping other beverages and food at safe storage temps. But because there are a lot of moving parts in this system, it can be noisy - just like the refrigerator in your kitchen. Not to mention that refrigerants present certain ecological concerns by introducing CFCs and HCFC-s into the environment. The Principles of Thermoelectric Cooling In contrast, thermoelectric coolers are environmentally safe, since they don't have any hazardous materials fueling the cooling process. Thermoelectric cooling relies on the Peltier effect, named for the 19th century scientist who discovered it. When an electric charge is sent through two joined pieces of metal it creates a heat flux, and heat is transferred from one side of the device to the other. One side gets hot and the other side gets cold. The core cooling device (called a heat pump) is small, not much more than an inch square, with semiconductor wires embedded between the two ceramic plates: Because it is small and has no moving parts, a thermoelectric heat pump operates silently, which is a big advantage over the usual sort of refrigerator that uses vapor compression to provide cooling. In a wine cooler, the heat pump is combined with a heat sink - a large, passive component made up of stacks of aluminum fins that allow heat to dissipate efficiently. The cold side of the combined heat pump-heat sink is inserted into the interior of the wine cooler, and the hot side extends out the back of the compartment (though protected by a back panel on the unit). Fans attached to each side of the heat sink improve the unit's ventilation, circulating the cool air inside more evenly and expelling heat outside more effectively. Thermoelectric Limitations There are some important limitations to the effectiveness of a thermoelectric cooler that you should be aware of before you buy one. They don't get as cold as a compressor cooler. On average, most thermoelectric coolers won't cool below 50°F, though you will find some (like our dual zone AW-210ED) that can go as low as 44°F. They don't work when it's too hot. Unlike a refrigerator, a thermoelectric cooler doesn't produce cold air. What it does is remove the heat from inside the cooler compartment. This means that when the temperature is too hot (over 80°F) it will have trouble removing enough heat to keep the temperature at the ideal wine storage level of 55°F. They don't work when it's too cold. There is no mechanism to add heat into wine cooler, so when the ambient temperature drops below 50°F, the temperature inside will drop as well, affecting the storage conditions of your wine. What this means is that before you select a thermoelectric wine cooler, be sure to check the manufacturer's specifications. Make sure it has a thermostat range that matches your wine storage preferences, and be sure to follow the recommendations for ambient temperatures. These coolers are meant to be used indoors in controlled environments, not in garages, sheds or outside. Thermoelectric Cooler Advantages As has already been noted, one of the big advantages of thermoelectric wine coolers versus compressor wine coolers is that they are environmentally safe, because they don't use refrigerants that have been linked to ozone depletion. When operating under proper conditions, they also use less electricity to operate than a compressor system, which benefits both the environment and your wallet. They are also much quieter than regular refrigerators, since the only moving parts are the small internal fans. This means they won't intrude on your indoor environment - or keep you from enjoying your favorite show on TV! Another positive side-effect of no moving parts is that a thermoelectric wine cooler is almost virtually vibration free. This means your prized wines won't be continually upset, and the natural sedimentation process that occurs as wine ages won't be disturbed. In other words, your wine will taste better when you're ready to drink it. Also improving the quality of your wine is the more consistent interior temperature. While a compressor cooler might fluctuate as much 10 degrees from top to bottom, a thermoelectric cooler maintains a more even temperature throughout the cooler. Getting the Most out of Your Thermoelectric Wine Cooler To get the best performance from your thermoelectric wine cooler, keep the following guidelines in mind: Make sure you keep it where the ambient temperature is in the recommended range of 50° to 80°F. Leave at least 5" of clearance around the cooler (for freestanding units) to allow proper ventilation. If there is not enough ventilation to disperse heat effectively, the heat pump will overheat and burn out. This is the number one reason why thermoelectric wine coolers fail! For the above reason, do not ever install a freestanding thermoelectric wine cooler into your cabinetry. Units that are meant to be built-in have special ventilation mechanisms visible on the front of the unit, just like your refrigerator. If the wine cooler seems to be making too much noise, make sure it is positioned on a level surface and evenly balanced. NewAir thermoelectric wine coolers have adjustable leveling feet that let you compensate for uneven flooring. If leveling the cooler does not alleviate the noise problem, one of the fans in the unit might be obstructed. See if you can spot anything on or around the fans that might be making it spin noisily.
  18. Monte 5 BRU 10 2010 Interested to see how these taste. Not much of an aroma in the box...condition is perfect.
  19. Jumping in on this topic with a related question...my New Air is now officially full...very tight. I use to be a stickler for cracking open boxes but now find that my Oasis XL is keeping them properly humidified without them being cracked. Your thoughts on how much if any a CC dress box has to be "cracked" open? Thanks to all who reply.
  20. Oh My...this might be a sign of end times...I completely agree with Ken!

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