Cohiba Stevie

Whats your setup?

  

622 members have voted

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  1. 1. What type of humidor are you using?

  2. 2. What type of humification are you using?

    • Active (Please specify: Cigar Oasis, Hydra etc.)
    • Passive (Please specify: Heartfelt beads, HCM beads, Boveda, crystals etc.)
    • Basic (distilled water / PG solution with foam humidifier)
    • Other (Please specify with post)
  3. 3. Does your collection mainly consist of

    • All singles, unboxed.
    • Mostly singles unboxed, with 1 or 2 boxes
    • Boxes only
    • Mostly boxes, with a few singles in dedicated compartment.


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Have singles in the top drawer and full or partial boxes in the bottom.

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I have this solid wood, cedar lined chest that we are refishing and am thinking of using it for full box storage. Any thoughts on why that wouldn't be a good idea?

I am thinking of using beads in this and then placing the full boxes in zip lock bags and then putting them in.

post-9798-0-52792600-1328221113.jpg

Any feedback would be appreciated.

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Here's my Aristocrat. Two active humidifers on the bottom, three fans and temp controlled. I'd say it works great, although the humidity at to top of the unit is typically 2-3% below the bottom, where the active humidifers are located. I don't think this is a problem with the system as much as it is the fact that the thing is packed full of boxes (and it's actually quite a bit fuller now than in the pic below) and the streams of humid air have a difficult time making it up to the top shelf.

Also, while the internal fans are virtually silent, the humidifers are not and they run quite often. So much so that I wish there was a quieter option. If I were to do this over, in addition to making the unit 2x the size, I would probably ask Bob to find a quieter option for the humidifers even if that option took up more space.

Awesome!

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Uboat, a great looking unit there, kudos (and kudos also to Bob for another nice unit).

What's the wood finish on that? What type of wood? It's beautiful - almost looks like bocote or something like that.

Thanks. It's East Indian Rosewood with Mahogany on the door frame and base.

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You should buy what Bob recommends unless you know better! Having studied and built, and written exhaustively about humidor science on this site, I have the experience to tell you, that unless you know more than Bob does, you should just take his advice.

I have concluded that humidor design depends really on your home or office environment. You have to take notice of what your environment is and how much difference (the delta) you would like to see in the humidor environment and design or buy a humidor based on that information. I mean, if your home is 70 deg F. and 60 RH there is not much need for a proper humidor, is there?

Production humidors typically assume that you live in an environment that is dryer than you want to store your cigars. This is a safe assumption based on the known comfort level of the human being and the conditioned space that most of us reside in. If this is true for you, then many solutions are available to you.

Humidors kept in a relatively dry environment will require their water vapor replenished regularly. How you accomplish the replenishment will depend on the delta (difference between the ambient and your preferred conditions) and the rate at which your humidor exchanges air with the outside environment. Lets call that rate of exchange, for the sake of argument, the Desorption Isotherm of your object. The object being your humidor and its contents.

A Desorption Isotherm is not constant but a likely a curved or S shaped line based on one temperature setting. The isotherm (meaning the graph of the desorption isothermal line) is a function of the material of the humidors construction (how airtight it is), the cigars inside, the boxes and the humidifier. You simply cannot design one of these things without knowledge of the outside environment, or assumptions about the outside environment!

You need to ask yourself, how dry is your house? Unless you know what to expect in your home from previous experience, AND the performance of your new humidor, AND how your chosen humidifier will perform; it is best to follow one who does! I simply would not recommend that you make guesses, unless you know what you are doing. You see, beyond risking your hoard of cigars, you are taking on the responsibility that should be shared with the humidor maker.

Here is an example of what I mean. If I sell you a cigar and tell you to cut the head and light the foot, and you cut the foot and light the head... you really can't blame me for selling you a dud cigar! If Bob sells you a box for your cigars and you modify it, and in two months your cigars turn to dust, you can't really blame him can you? So as time goes on, if you are unhappy with how your cigars are kept and you don't follow the manufactures guidelines, you will have no one to blame nor help you with solutions if you need them, as you are now responsible for your prototype.

I have built many humidors now and I prefer a sealed refrigerated unit. But I have owned one of Bob's for many years now. If your home is dry, on average, you may find that your wooden humidor burns through as much as a couple hundred ML's of water a month. This loss of water in a perfect world where all your cigars are at equilibrium, represents a point on your desorption isotherm.

I have been testing commercial desiccants for retail marketing to cigar owners for sometime now. Frankly, I don't like the lack of data supplied by those who produce humidity beads currently, and investigating that data allows me to make some educated "guesses" as to what humidor needs are, within reason. What I can tell you is some general information about beaded desiccants, desiccant buffers and humidity generators. I will make an assumption that my beads are likely marginally better, meaning effective surface area and uniformity of pore width, than the products currently available. Furthermore I have studied my specific product and based on that study I know how much water vapor they can hold based on weight, and on volume at a given equilibrium RH.

So if I had to take some guesses, I would say that most silica based desiccants that you would buy for your humidor, sold by the pound weight and preconditioned at 60 RH roughly represents about 500 ML of product and may hold, if they are an engineered product, uniform pours and surface area per gram of product, about 85 to 90 ML of water, if you are lucky. That's it mates! If you actually took your pound of conditioned beads and pull all the water out, as if you could wring them dry like a sponge, you would get about 90 ML of water, and I am being generous!

Now to come full circle and bring you back to your humidor, thinking that its monthly requirement for water vapor is going to be between 100 and 200 ML of water per month (based on a lot of assumptions), and your desiccant product only holds 90 ML of water at equilibrium RH 60... then your desiccant product will be stealing water from your cigars at a rate of 3 to 6 ML a day the day you put your cigars in it. Desiccants are a "nominal" water supplier, a buffer for a sealed system and not best in an system that needs a constant supply. They can be useful in buffering your constant supply system, but they are not designed to supply large amounts of water as a humidifier would otherwise do. Desiccants are not sponges. They are not designed to absorb liquid water. They adsorb (notice the spelling here) and desorb water vapor on a scale that is calculable.

If you have a need for a supply of water in the area of 1 to 2 hundred ML's a month, you are going to need a **** load of a desiccant system to make this work. What I am saying is, if this humidity gadget that you are buying does adsorb water vapor (works according to a cycle known as hysteresis) then it is not likely going to work very well in this situation. Not for the size of boxes that Bob typically builds, unless it is really effin' big.

Yeah it took a lot to get that out but here is the sort version of it again. I would buy the active humidification that Bob recommends and my advice does not depend on me guessing as to how this all should work.

Best of luck regardless, -the Pig

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You should buy what Bob recommends unless you know better! Having studied and built, and written exhaustively about humidor science on this site, I have the experience to tell you, that unless you know more than Bob does, you should just take his advice.

I have concluded that humidor design depends really on your home or office environment. You have to take notice of what your environment is and how much difference (the delta) you would like to see in the humidor environment and design or buy a humidor based on that information. I mean, if your home is 70 deg F. and 60 RH there is not much need for a proper humidor, is there?

Production humidors typically assume that you live in an environment that is dryer than you want to store your cigars. This is a safe assumption based on the known comfort level of the human being and the conditioned space that most of us reside in. If this is true for you, then many solutions are available to you.

Humidors kept in a relatively dry environment will require their water vapor replenished regularly. How you accomplish the replenishment will depend on the delta (difference between the ambient and your preferred conditions) and the rate at which your humidor exchanges air with the outside environment. Lets call that rate of exchange, for the sake of argument, the Desorption Isotherm of your object. The object being your humidor and its contents.

A Desorption Isotherm is not constant but a likely a curved or S shaped line based on one temperature setting. The isotherm (meaning the graph of the desorption isothermal line) is a function of the material of the humidors construction (how airtight it is), the cigars inside, the boxes and the humidifier. You simply cannot design one of these things without knowledge of the outside environment, or assumptions about the outside environment!

You need to ask yourself, how dry is your house? Unless you know what to expect in your home from previous experience, AND the performance of your new humidor, AND how your chosen humidifier will perform; it is best to follow one who does! I simply would not recommend that you make guesses, unless you know what you are doing. You see, beyond risking your hoard of cigars, you are taking on the responsibility that should be shared with the humidor maker.

Here is an example of what I mean. If I sell you a cigar and tell you to cut the head and light the foot, and you cut the foot and light the head... you really can't blame me for selling you a dud cigar! If Bob sells you a box for your cigars and you modify it, and in two months your cigars turn to dust, you can't really blame him can you? So as time goes on, if you are unhappy with how your cigars are kept and you don't follow the manufactures guidelines, you will have no one to blame nor help you with solutions if you need them, as you are now responsible for your prototype.

I have built many humidors now and I prefer a sealed refrigerated unit. But I have owned one of Bob's for many years now. If your home is dry, on average, you may find that your wooden humidor burns through as much as a couple hundred ML's of water a month. This loss of water in a perfect world where all your cigars are at equilibrium, represents a point on your desorption isotherm.

I have been testing commercial desiccants for retail marketing to cigar owners for sometime now. Frankly, I don't like the lack of data supplied by those who produce humidity beads currently, and investigating that data allows me to make some educated "guesses" as to what humidor needs are, within reason. What I can tell you is some general information about beaded desiccants, desiccant buffers and humidity generators. I will make an assumption that my beads are likely marginally better, meaning effective surface area and uniformity of pore width, than the products currently available. Furthermore I have studied my specific product and based on that study I know how much water vapor they can hold based on weight, and on volume at a given equilibrium RH.

So if I had to take some guesses, I would say that most silica based desiccants that you would buy for your humidor, sold by the pound weight and preconditioned at 60 RH roughly represents about 500 ML of product and may hold, if they are an engineered product, uniform pours and surface area per gram of product, about 85 to 90 ML of water, if you are lucky. That's it mates! If you actually took your pound of conditioned beads and pull all the water out, as if you could wring them dry like a sponge, you would get about 90 ML of water, and I am being generous!

Now to come full circle and bring you back to your humidor, thinking that its monthly requirement for water vapor is going to be between 100 and 200 ML of water per month (based on a lot of assumptions), and your desiccant product only holds 90 ML of water at equilibrium RH 60... then your desiccant product will be stealing water from your cigars at a rate of 3 to 6 ML a day the day you put your cigars in it. Desiccants are a "nominal" water supplier, a buffer for a sealed system and not best in an system that needs a constant supply. They can be useful in buffering your constant supply system, but they are not designed to supply large amounts of water as a humidifier would otherwise do. Desiccants are not sponges. They are not designed to absorb liquid water. They adsorb (notice the spelling here) and desorb water vapor on a scale that is calculable.

If you have a need for a supply of water in the area of 1 to 2 hundred ML's a month, you are going to need a **** load of a desiccant system to make this work. What I am saying is, if this humidity gadget that you are buying does adsorb water vapor (works according to a cycle known as hysteresis) then it is not likely going to work very well in this situation. Not for the size of boxes that Bob typically builds, unless it is really effin' big.

Yeah it took a lot to get that out but here is the sort version of it again. I would buy the active humidification that Bob recommends and my advice does not depend on me guessing as to how this all should work.

Best of luck regardless, -the Pig

Check your email pal :)

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Thankyou for your lengthy post pigfish, i know on these boards your knowledge an wisdom regarding humidification is held in high regard. I think it might be worth having an admin sticky this thread as there are some really useful bits of info here.

The cabinet i have ordered i am confident will hold up fine as it is literally very small. I think if i over compensate with passive humidification i should hopefully be ok. Ive decided to forget the cigarspa due to my findings in this thread.

Thanks again.

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Here's my Aristocrat. Two active humidifers on the bottom, three fans and temp controlled. I'd say it works great, although the humidity at to top of the unit is typically 2-3% below the bottom, where the active humidifers are located. I don't think this is a problem with the system as much as it is the fact that the thing is packed full of boxes (and it's actually quite a bit fuller now than in the pic below) and the streams of humid air have a difficult time making it up to the top shelf.

Also, while the internal fans are virtually silent, the humidifers are not and they run quite often. So much so that I wish there was a quieter option. If I were to do this over, in addition to making the unit 2x the size, I would probably ask Bob to find a quieter option for the humidifers even if that option took up more space.

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Gorgeous

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Thanks. It's East Indian Rosewood with Mahogany on the door frame and base.

Beautiful woodgrain to that. Thanks for the info on wood type. Bob sure knows how to pick 'em!!!!

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Ok so here's the scoop, I've recently placed an order with Bob Staebell at aristocrat humidors for a small cabinet humidor, it should be ready in a few months and I am literally counting down the days.

I have decided that I don't want to use Bobs active humidification system as I have concerns that its ability to output humidity only may not be a good idea for naked singles, especially as it is quite a small cabinet.

What I have decided to do is go with a Cigar Spa from Germany, its a pricey piece of kit but its an active system that both outputs and absorbs humidity, I've contacted the manufacturer and they said it would be perfect for my size of cabinet.

Cigar Spa

Hello I'm new and my name is Ryan. I researched many ways of storing cigars and decided to go with this method and am very happy I did.

So what is your setup?

* Free bar fridge with glass door from Ranbuild. Turned off and kept in a cupboard.

notes. Tip! To remove any plastic smells or other odours wash the internal walls with distilled water and go to the pet shop and get an activated charcoal bag and put it in the fridge for 2 days with door shut before you do anything else. After 2 days take it out. This will have soaked up an odours.

* Unscented kitty litter crystals (large ones) in a media bag.

notes. Before you insert cigars for the first time (when your seasoning the fridgedor) put these in the bottom of the fridge(humid air rises) in a dry state initially for 2 days and see what humidity is then. If low then lightly spray some distilled water on it and check again in 2 days. You should also put 5-6 empty cigar boxes in now as well.

* 2 digital hygrometers. Place one towards top of fridge and the other in the middle.

* Empty cigar boxes to fill up free space which acts as ceder shelves substitutes (for smell and humidity absorption/regulation).

notes. Depending on how many full cigar boxes you put in will depend on how many empty ones you will need. The rule is to keep the fridge relatively full of boxes all the time. n.b the photos attached were taken before I put in all of my full boxes so it looks a bit empty. As stated earlier, when seasoning the fridge put in ONLY empty boxes.

* I also have 2 desktop humidors for storing singles as the fridge is only used to store boxes.

Why does it work for you?

Keeps perfect humidity. The hygrometer, from **** Smith, has also an external temperature sensor connected to a cable. I have run the cable between the door and the cabinet and that creates a very small opening in the seal which keeps the air from going stale. I'm not sure why people try and make a fridge completely air tight. If you bought a timber cabinet humidor then that wouldn't be air tight anyway. You do need to have a tiny bit of air exchange.

What problems do you face if any?

None. Recommend this way to everyone. Go down to Big W or somewhere and get a really cheap bar fridge WITH a glass front door. Doesn't matter if you even get a second hand one and it doesn't work as you don't turn it on. Although this is suitable for my climate (Bowral, Southern Highlands, NSW) it may not work for those in hotter climates.

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You should buy what Bob recommends unless you know better! Having studied and built, and written exhaustively about humidor science on this site, I have the experience to tell you, that unless you know more than Bob does, you should just take his advice.

I have concluded that humidor design depends really on your home or office environment. You have to take notice of what your environment is and how much difference (the delta) you would like to see in the humidor environment and design or buy a humidor based on that information. I mean, if your home is 70 deg F. and 60 RH there is not much need for a proper humidor, is there?

Production humidors typically assume that you live in an environment that is dryer than you want to store your cigars. This is a safe assumption based on the known comfort level of the human being and the conditioned space that most of us reside in. If this is true for you, then many solutions are available to you.

Humidors kept in a relatively dry environment will require their water vapor replenished regularly. How you accomplish the replenishment will depend on the delta (difference between the ambient and your preferred conditions) and the rate at which your humidor exchanges air with the outside environment. Lets call that rate of exchange, for the sake of argument, the Desorption Isotherm of your object. The object being your humidor and its contents.

A Desorption Isotherm is not constant but a likely a curved or S shaped line based on one temperature setting. The isotherm (meaning the graph of the desorption isothermal line) is a function of the material of the humidors construction (how airtight it is), the cigars inside, the boxes and the humidifier. You simply cannot design one of these things without knowledge of the outside environment, or assumptions about the outside environment!

You need to ask yourself, how dry is your house? Unless you know what to expect in your home from previous experience, AND the performance of your new humidor, AND how your chosen humidifier will perform; it is best to follow one who does! I simply would not recommend that you make guesses, unless you know what you are doing. You see, beyond risking your hoard of cigars, you are taking on the responsibility that should be shared with the humidor maker.

Here is an example of what I mean. If I sell you a cigar and tell you to cut the head and light the foot, and you cut the foot and light the head... you really can't blame me for selling you a dud cigar! If Bob sells you a box for your cigars and you modify it, and in two months your cigars turn to dust, you can't really blame him can you? So as time goes on, if you are unhappy with how your cigars are kept and you don't follow the manufactures guidelines, you will have no one to blame nor help you with solutions if you need them, as you are now responsible for your prototype.

I have built many humidors now and I prefer a sealed refrigerated unit. But I have owned one of Bob's for many years now. If your home is dry, on average, you may find that your wooden humidor burns through as much as a couple hundred ML's of water a month. This loss of water in a perfect world where all your cigars are at equilibrium, represents a point on your desorption isotherm.

I have been testing commercial desiccants for retail marketing to cigar owners for sometime now. Frankly, I don't like the lack of data supplied by those who produce humidity beads currently, and investigating that data allows me to make some educated "guesses" as to what humidor needs are, within reason. What I can tell you is some general information about beaded desiccants, desiccant buffers and humidity generators. I will make an assumption that my beads are likely marginally better, meaning effective surface area and uniformity of pore width, than the products currently available. Furthermore I have studied my specific product and based on that study I know how much water vapor they can hold based on weight, and on volume at a given equilibrium RH.

So if I had to take some guesses, I would say that most silica based desiccants that you would buy for your humidor, sold by the pound weight and preconditioned at 60 RH roughly represents about 500 ML of product and may hold, if they are an engineered product, uniform pours and surface area per gram of product, about 85 to 90 ML of water, if you are lucky. That's it mates! If you actually took your pound of conditioned beads and pull all the water out, as if you could wring them dry like a sponge, you would get about 90 ML of water, and I am being generous!

Now to come full circle and bring you back to your humidor, thinking that its monthly requirement for water vapor is going to be between 100 and 200 ML of water per month (based on a lot of assumptions), and your desiccant product only holds 90 ML of water at equilibrium RH 60... then your desiccant product will be stealing water from your cigars at a rate of 3 to 6 ML a day the day you put your cigars in it. Desiccants are a "nominal" water supplier, a buffer for a sealed system and not best in an system that needs a constant supply. They can be useful in buffering your constant supply system, but they are not designed to supply large amounts of water as a humidifier would otherwise do. Desiccants are not sponges. They are not designed to absorb liquid water. They adsorb (notice the spelling here) and desorb water vapor on a scale that is calculable.

If you have a need for a supply of water in the area of 1 to 2 hundred ML's a month, you are going to need a **** load of a desiccant system to make this work. What I am saying is, if this humidity gadget that you are buying does adsorb water vapor (works according to a cycle known as hysteresis) then it is not likely going to work very well in this situation. Not for the size of boxes that Bob typically builds, unless it is really effin' big.

Yeah it took a lot to get that out but here is the sort version of it again. I would buy the active humidification that Bob recommends and my advice does not depend on me guessing as to how this all should work.

Best of luck regardless, -the Pig

As much as I'm beads' #1 fan, you are bang on, my friend. I have almost 20 lbs of beads in my 100ft^3 walk-in, and have ordered a Cigar Oasis XL II today to perform that active humidifcation componenet which was missing.

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So what is your setup?

Main humidor is an old bar fridge and I sealed up the internal holes with the least stinky silicone I could find. Using the 65% beads which work well most of the year. Never plug it in, but suspect the door seal has seen better days. Inside the fridge is my old desktop (obviously out-grew that one) but it is handy to keep inside the main one as it is essentially soaked in the correct RH all the time. Whip it out when guests are here so there is a handy selection to choose from.

Why does it work for you?

Free fridge cast off from work. Handy size, good internal racking plus door pockets. The smell when I open the door :perfect10::hungry:

What problems do you face if any?

In summer now and we have had the the odd hot day and then big humidity when the weather changes which puts the internal RH to 71% for a couple days(at 23C). Like Colt, in the driest months of winter I might have to add a little water from time to time. I figure fixing the door seal will solve all the problems. May even upgrade to a new bigger fridge someday.

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I use a small and large desktop and a traveldor. I run heartfelt and shilala/HCM beads in all three and they work great. Hold at a steady 65% humidity all around.

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I've got a unit bob built to match some other furniture I had. It is cooled (twin coolers) and based off a 25d model. Bob installed his new super quiet cooling fans. I can barely hear my humidification units when they come on so maybe Uboat is hearing his cooling fans rather than the internal humidification fans. Just a guess since Bob said the new cooling fans are about half as loud as the previous ones.

It holds a very steady 65/65 for me and I've only seem temporary spikes in humidity depending on the time of year and that is fixed with some minor adjustments. I've had it about a year and a half.

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What's my setup? Oh dear gawd....

....2 x "cooler-dors". Both in large white Coleman Xtreme Marine 100-quart coolers. Each holds approx. 20-25 boxes. Each one with a calibratable rectangular Xikar hygrometer. Passive humidification and balancing out with three 8oz(1/2lb) mesh bags of 65% RH Beads (double the amount needed for that space). Also, each cooler-dor has an Oust fan running in them, for air movement and balancing. And, just recently ordered some 31"x13"x5/8" finished spanish-cedar to put on the inside bottom of each coolerdor, to help with non-contact of boxes to "cold" surface (these coolerdors are in my basement crawlspace yearround, and they stay at 59 F to 64 F throughout the year). One coolerdor with "long term aging" boxes of general stuff that I already have a box on the go in my cabinet, and then the other coolerdor with "special RE/LE stuff" in. Need to get a third cooler soon. :rolleyes:

Lastly, online locker with Czar's with some group buy stuff with a few guys here. I think we've got about a dozen nice boxes of stuff tucked away.

Wife hasn't yet noticed the 2nd cooler, nor does she know about the online locker stuff.... :lookaround:

This post made me finally decide to finish/update things with my coolerdors after some recent trial and error....

Got my thread updated with the coolerdor stuff: http://www.friendsofhabanos.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=102883&view=findpost&p=286803

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Some very impressive operations here. That aristocrat is stunning.

I'm utilizing pretty simple set up right now - two desktop humis (larger one for CCs and smaller for NCs). The CC humidor is manufactured by Diamond Crown (the St. James model) and the smaller NC humidor is a cheap glass-top model that I bought online. I use 65% RH beads in the CC and 69% Boveda pack in the NC with Xikar puck hygrometers in both. From my experience so far, the HF beads are the way to go and I will never use anything else.

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Pic is from about a month ago while I still mixed some of the NCs with CCs. Since joining czar, the thing is now filled 100% with CCs.

Going to be moving to a new house in the spring/summer, so once I get settled I will seriously consider making the leap up to a wineador in order to be able to handle my increased appetite for CCs.

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A few years back we added an addition onto the house. I found a corner in one of the new rooms that was suited for a built in humidor. I had the carpenter rip tongue and groove panels of Spanish cedar from wood purchased at a local lumberyard. Also, he built the door from the same Spanish cedar and inserted a polarized glass panel. The area is about the size of a small soda machine. I thought he did a very nice job.

The humidification device is automatically triggered based on desired, preset settings. Temperature is OK for the most part. Although the humidor was heavily covered with insulation, it still gets a bit too hot in the summer. I'll crack the door a bit and point a small fan towards the opening if the temp gets too high. Regardless, the temperature never rises above 68F.

I prefer to store the cigars in their boxes, but I do have a dedicated area for singles. I've never actually filled it up, but I suspect it will hold close to 100 boxes. The more content inside, the more stable the temperature and humidity. I do my best to keep the settings as stable as possible :rolleyes:

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Wine coolers with hf beads. 2 pounds of beads in the 32 bottle and 1 pound in the 16. 16 bottle is just for deep sleep storage.

It works because I don't have to do anything. Spray the beads every 3 months or so and forget about it. I did have to add some CPU fans for better circulation. They kick on every hour for 5 minutes.

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This is an older photo

WOW nice look! :thumbsup:

You got the tray from Forrest?

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I wish I had some of the cool setups like I've seen in this thread, but for so long as I'm living in Mexico the store is my setup.

Capacity on the shelves approx 80+ open boxes. Capacity in under shelve storage approximately 100 closed boxes.

Cooling and humidification courtesy of one mini-split AC unit (keeps cool for one and as a result maintains humidity when it's 90%+ humidity outside) and two humidifiers to level out humidity around 65%.

---

I am here: http://maps.google.com/maps?ll=20.631723,-87.070597

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1- 300 ct Desktop Humidor - 2 humidification elements (during winter, 2 boveda packs keep rH within 65-70 range)

1- 200 ct Desktop Humidor - 1 humidification element plus 2 boveda pack

1- 50 ct Desktop Humidor - 1 humidification element and one boveda pack

All work well, but I have to monitor during colder months to assure rH maintains consistent.

Cheers

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