What's in your glass today?


Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, BrightonCorgi said:

From Friday night, a pair of 1985 Vintage ports along with an incredible peach pie from a local farm.  All three were fantastic.

 

pair of 1985's.jpg

you could hardly have picked two better 85s. not seen them for a while but great wines. we had a 77 Croft on the weekend. not my fave 77 but not bad. does not sit anywhere near the best. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 3.3k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

More Japanese. My last Taketsuru 21. 

a couple of wines from yesterday's lunch (all listed in another post).

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

13 hours ago, Ken Gargett said:

you could hardly have picked two better 85s. not seen them for a while but great wines. we had a 77 Croft on the weekend. not my fave 77 but not bad. does not sit anywhere near the best. 

Haven't had '77 Croft for a while.  Mid pack for the vintage.  Saturday night I opened '66 Noval and '70 Dow

 

1966 Noval.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, BrightonCorgi said:

Haven't had '77 Croft for a while.  Mid pack for the vintage.  Saturday night I opened '66 Noval and '70 Dow

 

1966 Noval.jpg

70 Dow was long a favourite. when i first got interested, there were stocks of this in large supply for peanuts. so ridiculously cheap. stupidly i only bought a couple of bottles. wish i'd bought cases. 70 a fave vintage. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Ken Gargett said:

70 Dow was long a favourite. when i first got interested, there were stocks of this in large supply for peanuts. so ridiculously cheap. stupidly i only bought a couple of bottles. wish i'd bought cases. 70 a fave vintage. 

1970 is arguably to best post war vintage.  Not sure if either of us will be around long enough to know if '94 or '11 will surpass it, but I think they will due to cleaner processing at the quintas.

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, BrightonCorgi said:

1970 is arguably to best post war vintage.  Not sure if either of us will be around long enough to know if '94 or '11 will surpass it, but I think they will due to cleaner processing at the quintas.

apols. just did a great long response and managed to wipe it. all related to the quality of spirit so i have posted this instead. try and get back to it later post deadlines. 

 

The spirit of port

 

David Guimaraens of The Fladgate Partnership

David Guimaraens of The Fladgate Partnership (see our notes on his 2018s recently added to our 2018 port article), like Dirk Niepoort, Antonio Agrellos and João Nicolau de Almeida, is fascinated by the intricacies of the fortifying spirit used in port production. This is his answer to a question about the extent to which it influences how port, especially vintage port, tastes.

Thank you for referring to me on this wonderful topic of fortifying spirit for port. In fact, although this year has been very difficult in so many aspects of our lives and our work, it has been a great year for spirit, and I am delighted with its quality.

The wine spirit used to fortify port is naturally a very important component, making up 20% of every bottle, and the history of its origins and quality over the past couple of centuries is very interesting, but also very varied.

The important aspect to consider is that the spirit that is used should not interfere with the character of our ports, allowing the grapes to express the terroir where they originate. However, the quality of the spirit will inevitably affect every port that is made. Wine spirit, being the distillation of made wine, will reflect the quality of the wine distilled, and, as a result, we see variations in quality of spirit from one year to another, linked both to the quality of the year and to the global supply of wine in the market.

When I look back to vintage ports from the past, I see in them significant differences in the quality of spirits used. In the 1950s, harder and more aggressive spirits were used. The 1960s was a very good period for the quality of spirit, but the mid 1970s through to 1991 was a very poor period regarding the quality of the spirit used, reflecting directly on the vintage ports produced. After 1991 there was a significant improvement in the quality of spirit used, and from 2000 onwards we have experienced a very exciting level of quality for the finest ports produced.

There is no doubt that the time from the Portuguese revolution in 1974 until the liberalisation in 1991 (when port shippers were no longer required to buy their spirit from the Casa do Douro) was a complicated period for the quality of spirit. The supply from the Casa do Douro resulted in batches of 5 million litres of spirit being made whose quality was, at best, average. As a result of the liberalisation, as a winemaker I was able to work directly with the distillers and produce very clean and high-quality spirits, which do not interfere with the quality and character of our grapes. Today, as a result, young vintage ports express their fruit and complexity so much more, and they also age so much better. This is particularly important in vintage ports between 10 and 20 years old when they lose their youthful berry fruit but are still developing their bottle-maturation complexity.

I am completely certain that vintage ports since 2000 are much more enjoyable at all phases of their life than in the past. A young vintage port (410 years) is especially attractive for its richness of fruit, a vintage port between 1020 years shows better its bottle maturity while still carrying plenty of fruit, and from 20 years onwards, bottle maturity becomes the main complexing factor. There is also no reason why the spirits used today would reduce the ageing potential of vintage port.

During the time I spent in Australia between 1985 and 1990, I discovered this magical world of fortifying spirit. My thesis at university in Australia was on fortifying spirit, with precious help from James Godfrey at Seppelt (famous for his fortification expertise). The Australians really understood their spirits. I was very fortunate to have returned home to Portugal in 1990, with the spirit monopoly ending in 1991. It has been my passion ever since.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

0012a5634b853a1b6f6060213927b3cf.jpg

my better half and her two best friends are off to Napa, Sonoma and surrounding region for the next week and are going to be cruising around in a Jeep convertible top…..well, I can have fun too…starting with a Brunello


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/6/2021 at 9:21 PM, Mr.T said:

 

0012a5634b853a1b6f6060213927b3cf.jpg

my better half and her two best friends are off to Napa, Sonoma and surrounding region for the next week and are going to be cruising around in a Jeep convertible top…..well, I can have fun too…starting with a Brunello emoji4.png

Good choice.  Which vintage?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Good choice.  Which vintage?

Thanks!…2015


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

Ordered a variety of stuff from equipo navazos to try with my dad, have seen @Ken Gargett praise them numerous times over the years. If every bottle is like this I will be buying much much more.

9A5A5D67-92B1-4537-8636-E2E57889891E.jpeg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, yadegari6 said:

Ordered a variety of stuff from equipo navazos to try with my dad, have seen @Ken Gargett praise them numerous times over the years. If every bottle is like this I will be buying much much more.

9A5A5D67-92B1-4537-8636-E2E57889891E.jpeg

hope i have not misled you and i am a huge fan of everything these guys do, but this one is not sherry. it is actually a white wine from the palomino fino grape - so don't put it in the fridge thinking you have a few weeks with it. drink up, if any left. 

these wines they do are great but it is the sherries which really will blow you away. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Ken Gargett said:

hope i have not misled you and i am a huge fan of everything these guys do, but this one is not sherry. it is actually a white wine from the palomino fino grape - so don't put it in the fridge thinking you have a few weeks with it. drink up, if any left. 

these wines they do are great but it is the sherries which really will blow you away. 

You did not mislead at all! We finished the bottle, it was fantastic neither of us could put the glass down. The other two bottles I bought are sherries, la botta 83 and 91.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, yadegari6 said:

You did not mislead at all! We finished the bottle, it was fantastic neither of us could put the glass down. The other two bottles I bought are sherries, la botta 83 and 91.

 

looking forward to hearing what you think. i have put the website info on those wines below. have a feeling that i have some 91 but not the 83. prices here are in silly territory. 

La Bota 91 de Fino “Macharnudo Alto”

 

Saca of February, 2019
D.O. Jerez – Xérès – Sherry
15% alc. – 75cl
5,000 bottles

http://www.equiponavazos.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/bota91-1.png

La Bota de Fino 91 “Macharnudo Alto” is a saca made in February-March 2019 from the same batch of casks that already gave us the eight previous and precious editions of La Bota de Fino. This new release, of an estimated average age of ten years, comes now from a selection of casks of the solera, the first and the second criaderas where we have been particularly looking for finesse and freshness, always taking into account it is a mature fino. The nose shows very complex and intense aromas, and a remarkable roundness in the palate (the traditional buttery touch of old finos) as a result of the autolysis of dead “flor” yeasts resting on the bottom of the vessel. This is particularly true of the solera, where the flor is almost exhausted, while in the second criadera the yeast is still very lively and active, which provides the spiciness and pungency that are also notable features of this extraordinary wine. Of course, the first criadera has an intermediate profile between the solera and the second.

This is a wine for connoisseurs, bottled almost unfiltered in order to preserve its golden color and racy character. It can be decidedly enjoyed upon release, but its evolution in bottle will continue to delight consumers for many years, provided it is stored with the same care as any other fine white wine.

It performs best at temperatures ranging from 9-10º C, where it shows a lighter and fresher profile, to 13º C, where it fully displays its rich and complex aromatic range. On the table it is a most versatile wine, successfully matching a wide array of diverse foods: of course Ibérico ham, but also seafood dishes, shepherd’s pie, “a feira” octopus, grilled vegetables, not too mature farm cheeses…

 

 

La Bota 83 de Manzanilla Pasada “Bota NO”

 

“Bota NO”, saca of May, 2018
D.O. Manzanilla Sanlúcar de Barrameda
16.5% alc. – 50cl
Hijos de Rainera Pérez Marín
Sanlúcar de Barrameda
Production: 900 bottles

http://www.equiponavazos.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/bota83-1.jpg

The wine from this prodigious set of casks was never bottled until Equipo Navazos selected it in 2008 for its 10th release of ‘La Bota de…’, followed two years later by edition number 20 “Bota Punta”. Then there have been a few very limited releases until in December 2017 we launched La Bota de Manzanilla Pasada 80 “Bota Punta”, and then in May 2018 this La Bota de Manzanilla Pasada 83 “Bota NO”, again from a single cask of very peculiar character, number 11 out of a solera of 15. This is a very special wine that shows a particular complexity due to an astonishing balance of finesse and chalky minerality, and roasted dry fruit nuances due to the start of the process of amontillamiento. This manzanilla pasada is actually in the border with a manzanilla amontillada, a traditional denomination that in our opinion is wrongly banned from labels.

What makes this wine truly unique and gifted with unmatched biological character (intense and steely salty notes on the palate) is that the butts are filled up to “a tocadedos” level—well above the 5/6 mark that is common in the Sherry district. In this fashion, the layer of yeast/flor inside these butts (much weakened by the age and lack of nutrients of the wine) is significantly smaller and thinner and can be kept alive on the sole basis of scarce periodic refreshments—acting as barely sufficient barrier between the wine and the intensely oxidizing effect of air. On the other hand, its very weakness implies that this protective effect is only a mild one, which is evidenced in the elegant oxidative notes of this manzanilla as well as the rising level of alcohol, climbing above 16%.

The real average age of this wine must be around 14 years. It is a complex and powerful wine, of balanced freshness and elegant oxidation notes that make it truly unique. Stunningly versatile on the dinner table, it matches a wide variety of dishes, from the most easygoing (rich fish dishes, fish-based rice recipes, charcuterie) to the most difficult (scrambled eggs with boletus edulis, runny sheep cheeses). Best served around 12º C, in moderately large stemware.

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


Community Software by Invision Power Services, Inc.