Does wrapper color change with age?


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Simple question. Just something I've been pondering about. Does the color of a wrapper change over the course of 5.. 10.. 15 years of aging?

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I've had 3 cabs of RA RE Paises Bajos, The Cortos. The first 2 were light wrappers that smoked and tasted great. The 3rd cab bought later than the others from another LCDH had much darker wrappers than the other 2. They still smoke and taste as great as the first 2 cabs but have darker wrappers for some reason. I'm guessing it was the way they were stored at the LCDH.

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1 hour ago, JLFIRST said:

I've had 3 cabs of RA RE Paises Bajos, The Cortos. The first 2 were light wrappers that smoked and tasted great. The 3rd cab bought later than the others from another LCDH had much darker wrappers than the other 2. They still smoke and taste as great as the first 2 cabs but have darker wrappers for some reason. I'm guessing it was the way they were stored at the LCDH.

We know that cigars are sorted by wrapper color at boxing time, and the difference in shading among even a single box code can be quite pronounced.  To say nothing of different codes, factories, and vintages.

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Sometimes it's like oils have been driven deeper into the wrapper, sometimes it's like oil has been driven out to the surface of the wrapper.

I'd say I've noticed an amount of colour change definitely.

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19 hours ago, Fugu said:

If it turns to green you should be alarmed.

It is not possible for a cured leaf to turn green (unless it was cured to candela shade, but then it cannot become "more green").

Cigar tobacco is air cured.  The purpose of air curing is to remove the chlorophyll from the leaf.  As a rule of thumb, if removed slowly, the tobacco leaf will turn brown.  If removed too fast, you end up with a dried but green leaf.

 

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7 hours ago, Andy04 said:

It is not possible for a cured leaf to turn green (unless it was cured to candela shade, but then it cannot become "more green").

Cigar tobacco is air cured.  The purpose of air curing is to remove the chlorophyll from the leaf.  As a rule of thumb, if removed slowly, the tobacco leaf will turn brown.  If removed too fast, you end up with a dried but green leaf.

 

Im pretty sure he was joking or referring to mold.

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We know that cigars are sorted by wrapper color at boxing time, and the difference in shading among even a single box code can be quite pronounced.  To say nothing of different codes, factories, and vintages.


I know this but there were only 2000 boxes made of these and all at the same factory. Mine all have the same date and factory codes.

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