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I have the older, bulkier version of this ...

http://www.delonghi.com/en-us/products/coffee-and-espresso/coffee-makers/pump-espresso/dedica-ec-680mb-0132106100

The instructions are translated into English very badly, so the setup and programming are a little weird. But other than that, it's been great for the past 5 years or so.

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May I present my faithful coffee maker. I grew up with this coffee maker in the 1960's. It followed me to college and then grad school. Now over 50 years later it remains my one and only coffee maker.

I went to manual pour over coffee about a year ago. I use a cheap Hario ceramic dripper, takes a bit more time and effort than a machine but well worth it imo. You can really fine tune your cup. Wi

I'll join in the fun too as I'm also a coffee geek.  What I like: Freshly ground beans 7-10 days off roast is ideal for me, but I'll drink coffee much much older than that. Even months old.

1 hour ago, Phillys said:

When I would switch to coarse, it would take forever to find the perfect setting for the Rancilio, so I bought a second one for coarser grinds.

This is one reason I don't use the Rancilio as much; the grinder needs to be calibrated if you don't use it daily.  That, it's messy, and I like to drink more ounces of coffee than a latte and the like...

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Seconded the pour-over process, although you'll need to get yourself a scale (which everyone should have for consistent results), a good grinder (again, everyone should have), and a kettle with a gooseneck for better pouring. 

IMHO I'd advise against using a Chemex, for a couple of reasons, if you're starting to up your game.

1.) Chemex requires something of a learning curve that can vary depending on the origin, roast level, and processing method of the beans. At worst, that's more complicated than it sounds...but suffice to say, there's a learning curve that might put some beginners off (though it's really not that difficult once you get used to it).

2.) The paper filters the Chemex uses are thicker than other canonical or basket-style filters. This means two things: you'll have to rinse it more, unless you *really* like the taste of paper; and, more importantly, it takes a *lot* of the body out of the coffee--though it can certainly bring out more of the subtle brightness/acidity of lighter roasts.

3.) The Chemex itself, and the filters it uses, are too expensive for what they are...though the thing certainly is pretty.

This second point is why I don't personally use the Chemex. I'm a huge fan of light roasts (especially a good dry-processed Ethiopian), but I'd prefer to have a pour-over that's much more accommodating of other roasts and origins. For this reason, I use the Beehouse dripper (Link: https://www.amazon.com/Bee-House-Ceramic-Coffee-Dripper/dp/B0047VUNVE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1496939661&sr=8-1&keywords=beehouse+dripper)

It's a very versatile and forgiving dripper with almost no learning curve, and it uses standard Melitta cone filters that are much more widely available than the Chemex.

Just my two cents.

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12 hours ago, PartagasIV said:

Technivorm, plus fresh beans and burr grind before brewing.

Yep.  I'm quite happy with my Technivorm.  I got sick of my inexpensive Krups, which turned ever pot bitter.  The Technivorm makes much better tasting coffee, and it's pretty quick.  

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14 hours ago, planetary said:

Yep. That's a great coffee maker.  I do Chemex pour-over when it's just my wife and I.

"The Technivorm machines seem popular in 'third wave' coffee circles, but I have no experience with them."

I actually own a coffee company and have a coffee fetish.

The Technivorm is the coffee maker we have. When I was in this coffee tasting competition, they had them, and I bought two of them.

For the espresso things, we like Nespresso. But I like the real thing best.

CB

 

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I've had this one for about 15 years made almost 15,000 cups according to the stats and have services it three times. This and good beans makes coffee so good I am very particular ability having one and how it's made when I'm not at home.

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Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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I have a Delonghi PrimaDonna S Deluxe for daily use and a Nespresso EN90 for when I want a little variety. Both have served me very well over the last 6-7 years.

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We have a Jura that grinds the beans per cup.  It also makes fancy milk coffee drinks.  But we stick to regular coffee mostly. Its easy to maintain and a fresh cup with our choice of beans.

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6 hours ago, canadianbeaver said:

"The Technivorm machines seem popular in 'third wave' coffee circles, but I have no experience with them."

I actually own a coffee company and have a coffee fetish.

The Technivorm is the coffee maker we have. When I was in this coffee tasting competition, they had them, and I bought two of them.

For the espresso things, we like Nespresso. But I like the real thing best.

CB

 

Will these make, say, 2 cups? Or is it a pot only ? I'm the only coffee drinker

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I've got a couple of stove tops for espresso, plus a couple of French presses which works for me. I'm an espresso or Americano feind but have to keep best beloved and/or occasional dinner guests happy...

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I roast with a Behmor 1600+ and brew with a Behmor Brazen. There are only a handful of mass produced automatic coffee makers in the world certified by the SCAA and the Brazen is one of them along with a couple others mentioned above. http://scaa.org/index.php?goto=home

Brazen can also drip into a chemex with is nice when you want that pour over style.

Cheers!  

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20 minutes ago, Ethernut said:

I roast with a Behmor 1600+ and brew with a Behmor Brazen. There are only a handful of mass produced automatic coffee makers in the world certified by the SCAA and the Brazen is one of them along with a couple others mentioned above. http://scaa.org/index.php?goto=home

Brazen can also drip into a chemex with is nice when you want that pour over style.

Cheers!  

Right.  The certified products are listed at http://www.scaa.org/?page=cert2

Here's the list:

  • Technivorm Moccamaster
  • Behmor Connected Brewer or Behmor Connected Coffee Brew System
  • KitchenAid Coffee Maker KCM0802
  • KitchenAid Pour Over Coffee Brewer (model KCM0801OB)
  • Bonavita Coffee Maker (model BV1900TS)
  • Bonavita BV1900TD 8-Cup Digital Coffee Brewer
  • OXO On 9-Cup Coffee Maker
  • OXO On 12-Cup Coffee Maker
  • Wilfa Precision Coffee Maker
  • BUNN 10-Cup Programmable Coffeemaker
  • Behmor Brazen Connected 8 Cup Coffee Maker
  • Cuisinart PurePrecision™ Pour Over Coffee Brewer
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Great convo here and so happy to read it as a owner of coffee roasting company. My best advice for all home brewers would be to get high quality fresh roasted coffee, understand water temps and dose weight , but the best investment you can make is in a good burr grinder (roughly $125). PM me for any specific questions we have many how to videos and great people to help you make the best home coffee for you. Just like cigars...drink what you like. 

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Switched to a french press around christmas last year and I haven't looked back. Like the other posts, a quality burr grinder and freshly roasted beans make all the difference.

 

With it already feeling like summer, I've been tuning my cold brew. Anyone here have a great process for cold brew? I've used my french press and tried filtering through a sieve so far, but I might switch to a toddy system or just use mason jars and a pour over to filter (pour over could be used for hot too obviously).

 

I live in a warm climate and mostly drink iced cold brew. I have a rotation of a couple of these.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00FFLY64U/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1496991793&sr=8-3&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=cold+brew+coffee+maker&dpPl=1&dpID=31%2BIc2UCSpL&ref=plSrch

I typically go through a pound a week of a mild espresso beans ground just over medium. 24 hr brew time that gives me a concentrate that I mix with water 1:1. I haven't started roasting my own yet but I've been warned that this illness is headed that way. :addict:

 

 

 

 

 

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Technivorm Mochamaster that I have makes a 10 cup pot.

edit: yes, you can make less

Nespresso that we have makes a cup and steams milk.

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I add about 1/8 teaspoon baking soda to the french press to lower the acidity and plunge the coffee 1/4 inch so all the grounds in the water while it steeps.

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