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FOH Mould Study

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55 minutes ago, Chuckmejia said:

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I thought it was dry Saudi Arabia. I wonder what the Prince would think?

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5 hours ago, KnightsAnole said:

I thought it was dry Saudi Arabia. I wonder what the Prince would think?

Sharif don't like it.  

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On 01/09/2017 at 2:57 AM, El Presidente said:

Greg has sent a new batch for testing. Should have the results back end of Sep. Some look promising. 

Always looking for more. The bounty stands :thumbsup:

Any news?

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I find this topic very interesting. I just moved a box of Monte Especial #2's from my long term wineador to my smoking wineador. It'a a beautiful LAU Sep 16 box I got off a 24:24 last year in November (I think it was). Anyway, I opened the box to take a look and low and behold there was wispy cottony white stuff around the caps. Also the cap pigtails felt wet (oily?). Didn't leave any residue on my fingers, but I'm just wondering if they need to sit in my long term for another couple months? Any ideas?

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3 hours ago, alloy said:

I find this topic very interesting. I just moved a box of Monte Especial #2's from my long term wineador to my smoking wineador. It'a a beautiful LAU Sep 16 box I got off a 24:24 last year in November (I think it was). Anyway, I opened the box to take a look and low and behold there was wispy cottony white stuff around the caps. Also the cap pigtails felt wet (oily?). Didn't leave any residue on my fingers, but I'm just wondering if they need to sit in my long term for another couple months? Any ideas?

Wipe off the mold. Check your humidity level in your long term wineador & adjust if necessary. Put them back in & check in on them every 4 to 6 mos. if your humdity levels are tracking correct let them sleepy sleep for another 3 to 4 years. Smoke 1 at that time & if all is well smoke up.

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5 hours ago, alloy said:

I find this topic very interesting. I just moved a box of Monte Especial #2's from my long term wineador to my smoking wineador. It'a a beautiful LAU Sep 16 box I got off a 24:24 last year in November (I think it was). Anyway, I opened the box to take a look and low and behold there was wispy cottony white stuff around the caps. Also the cap pigtails felt wet (oily?). Didn't leave any residue on my fingers, but I'm just wondering if they need to sit in my long term for another couple months? Any ideas?

Check your wineador for excess moisture. Also check other boxes that were next to the Montes.

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On 10/5/2017 at 5:37 AM, LeafLegionWW said:

Any news?

Received initial testing results and all samples returned as some form of fungi. Comprehensive results will be in by next week.

Keep you posted!

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9 hours ago, Fuzz said:

Check your wineador for excess moisture. Also check other boxes that were next to the Montes.

I checked the boxes. RG88, two boxes of Siglo II and a box of Trini Vigia's. All were good. Although they haven't been in the wineador as long as the Monte's. thanks for the info guys. 

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Finally had a chance to read this thread fully, thanks for all the work, well done.

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I have a running theory here about plume based on this study (Biochemical Engineering PhD student here, for whatever that's worth):  plume is mold, but that doesn't mean that plume in the "good" sense isn't real.  It may be that there is some strain of mold that presents as "plume,"  which is particularly dusty looking and grows on certain types of cigars more than others, and generally grows slower than traditional mold strains.  Perhaps it breaks down certain compounds in the oils of the wrapper, too, which would explain why "plume makes cigars better."

Might be the stupidest theory ever, but I figured I'd toss it up for discussion.

 

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I think aged cigars taste better. Improperly aged cigars have mold. Correlation with no causation.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

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MMMMMMMM

PLUME!!!

I licked them off with my tongue!!

I was also having some really nice creamy coffee this morning, therefore i dusted some over my coffee for some extra icing!

 

Splendid stuff!!

 

 

 

 

 

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This is awesome stuff.  Thank you for the undertaking.  I think this is revolutionary work.  I sure would be curious what the "experts" have to say about these findings.  

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So we’ve gone from “it’s not plume it’s mould, ya honkeynut!” to “it’s not mould, you’ve got a bacterial infection ya slapper!”. I’ve got an idea Rob. Antibacterial wipes for cigars

 

Fantastic work Greg and all else involved.

 

 

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An interesting point to raise here though, the appearance of the matter on the cigars while cataloging under macro was dusty. Dust is a rich source of bacteria so that may explain the results?

 

I think that the above is perhaps the most enlightening to me. 

We often here of "a fine dusting on my cigars"  They are the cigars that we tested in this batch along with some pipe tobacco samples that from the naked eye looked crystalline. 

In the end, these all turned out to be bacteria.  I learnt  that  dust contains a rich mix of bacteria and any sealed/unoccupied space will accumulate just as much dust as an unsealed one. 

 

From Wiki

Bacteria grow to a fixed size and then reproduce through binary fission, a form of asexual reproduction. Under optimal conditions, bacteria can grow and divide extremely rapidly, and bacterial populations can double as quickly as every 9.8 minutes. In cell division, two identical clone daughter cells are produced.

Based on the research to date, it is a fair assumption to say that "a fine dusting of plume" is most likely to be a "fine dusting of bacteria or mould"

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So what you are saying is that somewhere out there is a currently undocumented strain of bacteria unknown to science, but commonly observed by cigar smokers, allowing them to some how identify the finest tobacco by what grows on it? What should we call it then? Staphylococcus Plumeus?

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