great wine disasters...


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11 hours ago, Ken Gargett said:

i have to ask. what on earth did you think it would taste like? 

I thought the wet dog & cardboard flavors would cook off, but it did not.  The next option was down the drain, so why not try cooking with it at that point.  '83 Cockburn was an expensive vintage FWIW.  I think they went for more than Graham for whatever reason.

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On 4/7/2018 at 12:37 PM, BrightonCorgi said:

I had a TCA infected bottle of '83 Cockburn's VP (like everyone else) that I thought, "might as well use for a port wine reduction at this point...."  The friggin' reduction tasted like TCA!

Next time try putting a ball of cling wrap in the decanter with the TCA wine and shake it, it definitely removes most of the TCA taste but probably effects overall wine flavor .. for a reduction you should be fine.

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20 hours ago, s1911 said:

Next time try putting a ball of cling wrap in the decanter with the TCA wine and shake it, it definitely removes most of the TCA taste but probably effects overall wine flavor .. for a reduction you should be fine.

I've read this but never tried it.  

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Just now, BrightonCorgi said:

I've read this but never tried it.  

we tried it a few times with corked wines and the feeling was it might help a bit but dragging soggy clingwrap out of your lafite really doesn't appeal. 

surely screwcaps are far more acceptable than that?

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1 minute ago, Ken Gargett said:

we tried it a few times with corked wines and the feeling was it might help a bit but dragging soggy clingwrap out of your lafite really doesn't appeal. 

surely screwcaps are far more acceptable than that?

I simply don’t understand the thinking that when you are spending thousands of pounds for a case of wine, you’d want to risk any of them being corked. Yet still people resist the screwcap. Madness.

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15 minutes ago, ayepatz said:

I simply don’t understand the thinking that when you are spending thousands of pounds for a case of wine, you’d want to risk any of them being corked. Yet still people resist the screwcap. Madness.

in the tens of thousands of posts on this forum, there is not one with which i am more in agreement. 

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3 hours ago, ayepatz said:

I simply don’t understand the thinking that when you are spending thousands of pounds for a case of wine, you’d want to risk any of them being corked. Yet still people resist the screwcap. Madness.

Tradition.  It's not up to the consumer.  Convince Lafite to use screw caps.

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6 hours ago, BrightonCorgi said:

Tradition.  It's not up to the consumer.  Convince Lafite to use screw caps.

it is absolutely up to the consumer. if they don't push for it, it won't happen. and you can bet that lafite et al are all doing trials. 

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2 hours ago, Ken Gargett said:

it is absolutely up to the consumer. if they don't push for it, it won't happen. and you can bet that lafite et al are all doing trials. 

Agreed. Tradition goes out the window if the market demands change. Just look at the amount of dildo cigars flooding the market at the expense of smaller vitolas.

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14 hours ago, Ken Gargett said:

it is absolutely up to the consumer. if they don't push for it, it won't happen. and you can bet that lafite et al are all doing trials. 

I'd love to try some aged Grand Cru with screw caps.  Oldest wine I have tried with screw caps was 10 years oldish and it was fine.

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16 minutes ago, BrightonCorgi said:

I'd love to try some aged Grand Cru with screw caps.  Oldest wine I have tried with screw caps was 10 years oldish and it was fine.

The closest parallel I can think of is Henschke's Hill of Grace which has been bottled under screwcap/Stelvin or the Vino-Lok glass stopper since the mid 2000s.   Would be very interesting to track their evolution.

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38 minutes ago, BrightonCorgi said:

I'd love to try some aged Grand Cru with screw caps.  Oldest wine I have tried with screw caps was 10 years oldish and it was fine.

Oldest wine I've had under screw cap was 14-15 years old. It had developed and mellowed over time, but was still great. I rarely worry about spoiled wine nowadays, as most of the wines are under screw cap.

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1 hour ago, Fuzz said:

Oldest wine I've had under screw cap was 14-15 years old. It had developed and mellowed over time, but was still great. I rarely worry about spoiled wine nowadays, as most of the wines are under screw cap.

I'd say 2-5% of my wines are with a screw cap.  Not that I avoid them either.

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12 hours ago, BrightonCorgi said:

I'd love to try some aged Grand Cru with screw caps.  Oldest wine I have tried with screw caps was 10 years oldish and it was fine.

i think boissett do some but they would not be much older than a decade at best.

the thing that completely convinces even the most skeptical is comparing the old rieslings from the late 70s and early 80s (they put some under screwcap for a while there but stopped with customer resistance - the next time all this was tried was very early this century and there was almost no resistance at all). the ones under cork are tired and dull and stale and most hanging on at best. the ones under screwcap are still fresh and vibrant and fabulous. they have aged steadily and are wonderful wines. i have seen some of corks' biggest supporters turned 180 by those wines alone. 

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11 hours ago, SirVantes said:

The closest parallel I can think of is Henschke's Hill of Grace which has been bottled under screwcap/Stelvin or the Vino-Lok glass stopper since the mid 2000s.   Would be very interesting to track their evolution.

have actually had a chance to look at some henschkes under exactly those conditions. under cork, an occasional star, plenty of excellent wines and some that are gone, either corked or tired. henschke was never too bad though they may have had a little brett for a while. under screwcap/vinolock, all the wines in the condition they should be. and they have years of gradual development ahead. 

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