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The only example I can comment on is the pho with tripe at my go to place. It was so clean and blended into the dish what just a little extra chew.

I've had some amazing headcheese, and enjoy boiled chicken hearts with a little fish sauce and lime.....I'd like to try more stuff, but I'm so fricking busy...

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a few years ago, talking to a mate who is a terrific chef, tony from tartufo (brother is amando from buon ricardo for sydneysiders). on the subject of tripe. in typical modest chef fashion, he de

I will eat whatever tastes good. Have had various grilled chicken parts in Japan, monkfish liver (ankimo) is a favorite food, however I have had some truly disgusting offal.  There is a latin tri

Another vote for haggis - all those parts of a sheep you don't want to look at in one tasty package. On Burns' night each year I get my Cub Scouts to try it (along with me channelling my Scottish half

10 hours ago, David88 said:

I’m always up for trying anything with the hope of being pleasantly surprised so offal is fine with me and it can be excellent.

Sheeps head is considered a delicacy in Mongolia. Can’t say I was a big fan though. 

F5DAD438-BF8C-4196-BB94-2D47A0E6A70A.jpeg

when i travelled in africa, i had two brothers from iceland cook their sheep's head fave dish - actually they did so by burying it like a hangi. fantastic.

i did a version - not buried - when back home at a dinner for friends. who absolutely loved it until one of the girls walked into the kitchen and saw the skull. she screamed and everyone immediately declared that what they had all asked for more, minutes earlier, was horrendous. 

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13 hours ago, Akela3rd said:

Another vote for haggis - all those parts of a sheep you don't want to look at in one tasty package. On Burns' night each year I get my Cub Scouts to try it (along with me channelling my Scottish half for the Address) and they love it. I then get messages from parents asking where they can get it because little Adeyola or whoever has a new favourite food. emoji39.png

I like most offal. It's only brains that put me off a bit, and only because of the texture.  Haggis is a favourite though, served in the traditional Scottish way ... Haggis, tatties and neeps, with a wee dram of scotch :)

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17 hours ago, Ken Gargett said:

a few years ago, talking to a mate who is a terrific chef, tony from tartufo (brother is amando from buon ricardo for sydneysiders). on the subject of tripe.

in typical modest chef fashion, he declared he made the best in australia. things grew and the last few years, a bunch of us have an annual offal lunch at his restaurant. we leave the menu to him and we bring some top wines that we think might go with offal, or that we simply want to drink (the tragedy this year was that two guys pulled out for family reasons the day before - their wines were the 79 krug and a magnum of 89 yquem). we did have an 02 krug, 05 bonneau du martray corton charlemagne, 97 tig, 13 sass, 03 henri bonneau, 00 and 05 pichon baron and plenty more.

the offal included carpaccio of ox tongue, oxtail mousse with bone marrow and blood pudding, lambs brains, slow roasted beef cheeks, sweetbreads, lambs kidneys on a skewer with drunken figs and chicken thighs, calves liver, chicken liver muesli, tony's fantastic tripe and more. am very hungry just writing this. and if anyone does tripe better than tony, i'm keen to try it. 

i am guessing we have a mix of fans of the stuff and others with no taste at all who won't touch it. 

Haven't had the pleasure of eating at Tartufo yet (but it's bookmarked for the next time I get to Brisbane), but the best tripa I have ever had was at Stefano's in Mildura.  Subtle, light, mouthwateringly tender.  

As for offal, it's all good.  Devilled lambs' kidneys are a feast, and a major British contribution to world cuisine (stop laughing!!).  Saumagen, haggis, andouilette -- all supremely tasty!  In Norway, I had smalahove, the local equivalent of the Icelandic svid (sp) -- sheep's head that has been dried, salted, smoked and then steamed for several hours.  Germans, of course, have their own specialities: black pudding, hot liverwurst, pannas (leftover bits of a slaughtered pig boiled with flour and blood, then left to set, often served with sugar beet molasses), and pancreas sausage (breaded and shallow-fried -- a Bavarian delicacy!).  Tongue is good in all ways: carpaccio, boiled, persillé, in aspic, you name it.  Ditto, of course, foie gras ... although I am a peasant and prefer a glass of oloroso Sherry to the classic sweet wine.  

The only downside is that all of this makes Her Who Must Be Obeyed shudder and refuse to kiss me after I indulge....

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1 hour ago, gweilgi said:

Haven't had the pleasure of eating at Tartufo yet (but it's bookmarked for the next time I get to Brisbane), but the best tripa I have ever had was at Stefano's in Mildura.  Subtle, light, mouthwateringly tender.  

sadly, tripe is not a regular on the menu but if you were going, you could call them ahead of time. 

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It was my Grandmother who introduced me to tripe at a young age. Simmered slowly in milk with onions and carrots with pepper and salt, and parsley for seasoning. Simmered for several hours until tender, thickened with a little corn starch, and served with potatoes. Occasionally, it would be breaded and deep fried and served with fresh vegetables. Nobody else in the family could stand it, but my Grandmother would prepare it for me whenever I visited, because I found it a treat. Another was slow roasted lambs hearts with a thick and rich broth.  Fond memories. For her, I figured it must have been a lot to do with the economies of surviving through the second world war, but we both enjoyed these things very much. And I love both tender tripe and tendon cooked until jelly-like in a good Pho along with raw fillet and slow cooked brisket.

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8 hours ago, Ken Gargett said:

.... and everyone immediately declared that what they had all asked for more, minutes earlier, was horrendous. 

Reminds me - what's also a treat is boiled and lightly smoked cow udder. Very difficult to come by these days. Creamy (in texture and taste), tender and smoky. Similar to tongue but softer. Served in slices, it looks like potpie - and we got very similar reactions when once put on a buffet.....

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There's a traditional Austrian dish called "Beuschel" which is basically a ragout of veal lung and veal heart.
Doesn't look very appealing, but is very delicious (if prepared properly):

beuschel-mit-knoedeln-453650.jpg

My favorite would be either chicken liver peri-peri (the tenderness and creaminess of the liver goes very well with the punch-in-the-face heat) or chicken liver pate:

IMG_8768.thumb.jpg.e179540ca4994299aed86a538621932f.jpg

You have to try out this recipie, you just have to!

https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/chicken-liver-pate

 

 

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I've partaken of a few parts of almost any and all beasts.

No too squeamish so game for about anything.

Loved Fejoida Wednesday business lunches in Brazil. Alway went for the "heavy", everything but the oink. Ears, tongues, tails, etc...

The wife always tells waiters at those restaurants with the unpublished tasting menus she'll eat about anything but sweetbreads. I'll order them when on menu.

About the only thing I can think of I haven't tried is insect-based plates. Haven't had the opportunity so I'll have to see when I get to where they're popular.....

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7 hours ago, awkwardPause said:

Why the pics, people!? Just why?

I keep having to scroll past these on my way to other topics. Can’t there just be an “offal delights” tab on the Kenfessions page? LOL!

 

 

noooo. i love the pics. keep em coming. 

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47 minutes ago, Habana Mike said:

I've partaken of a few parts of almost any and all beasts.

No too squeamish so game for about anything.

Loved Fejoida Wednesday business lunches in Brazil. Alway went for the "heavy", everything but the oink. Ears, tongues, tails, etc...

The wife always tells waiters at those restaurants with the unpublished tasting menus she'll eat about anything but sweetbreads. I'll order them when on menu.

About the only thing I can think of I haven't tried is insect-based plates. Haven't had the opportunity so I'll have to see when I get to where they're popular.....

For better or worse, cooked insects (apart from some exceptions) have very little taste by themselves. Insect dishes would likely be challenging because of the visual or the texture...

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@luckme10 I am sure that Cochinillo asado in Philly is good - but this the real thing and this is how it is cut, with a plate to show how tender it is. This the way it is done in central Spain where it was "invented" and where I am from. Had it many times in Segovia at the most popular place there, Meson Don Candido ...

 

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Fantastic homonym you guys. Offal? And took to page two to say it?

Fois Gras has to be up there with my fave foods, Cod  cheeks and the middle of a lobster, not just the tail. When I am done eating it, I have bits on my shirt and on my head, bib or not.

But no weird involuntary anatomy for me. Matthew however, will eat just about anything served.

CB

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10 hours ago, canadianbeaver said:

Fantastic homonym you guys. Offal? And took to page two to say it?

Fois Gras has to be up there with my fave foods, Cod  cheeks and the middle of a lobster, not just the tail. When I am done eating it, I have bits on my shirt and on my head, bib or not.

But no weird involuntary anatomy for me. Matthew however, will eat just about anything served.

Not to ruin your dietary habits, but if you have ever eaten hot dogs, you will already have had every unnamed and unmentionable bit of animal ...

 

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Just now, gweilgi said:

Not to ruin your dietary habits, but if you have ever eaten hot dogs, you will already have had every unnamed and unmentionable bit of animal ...

 

excellent point. and a few things other than just hot dogs. 

a friend once work in the "kitchens" of one of our two large department stores.

said that for every 144 chicken pies, they used two small chooks. 

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35 minutes ago, Ken Gargett said:

excellent point. and a few things other than just hot dogs. 

a friend once work in the "kitchens" of one of our two large department stores.

said that for every 144 chicken pies, they used two small chooks. 

Are Australian chooks casoaries or other large birds? One to google for the unaware ?

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Just now, Jeanff said:

Are Australian chooks casoaries or other large birds? One to google for the unaware ?

you mean cassowaries? no, we don't eat those. birds that can kill you get left alone.

a chook is aussie for a chicken. so just a normal chicken, the sort you'd usually buy in the supermarket. 

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3 minutes ago, Ken Gargett said:

you mean cassowaries? no, we don't eat those. birds that can kill you get left alone.

a chook is aussie for a chicken. so just a normal chicken, the sort you'd usually buy in the supermarket. 

Was wondering about my google search...IMG_0223.JPG.ad8aa157789d44c8cd05c4020c361d91.JPG

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