Exercise. Do you do it at all? What's your daily regime?


Recommended Posts

I need to shed some kilos. I've been in a good paddock for far too long. And at the moment my exercise regime consists of 1x sit-up. I sit up in bed in the morning, lay down again at night. 

I hate gyms. Who's got any hints, tips, pointers, to a regime that's easy to stick to long-term and provides results? 

Cheers,

Moe. 

  • Like 3
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 62
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I don't do ups; sit ups, pull ups, push ups, etc. I do lay downs. Ups are against gravity, and gravity is a law. I obey the law.

I like 12 or 16 ounce curls. I do as many as possible until I start to get dizzy. Then I do a couple more....

Weight loss happens in the kitchen with a healthy diet. The gym is for conditioning and adding strength. at 54 I'm 6' 2 172 lbs at 18% body fat - this is solely based on diet. Due to a variety of

Join a gym and force yourself to go there. I did several years ago. Just do cardio machines to keep the heart and vascular system healthy and stay toned. Not into bodybuilding. I will be 52 in October and this was the age my father died of a massive heart attack. His father died at 51 of a stroke. I don't wish to leave anytime soon, my daughter is only 12!

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Pickleball three nights/week.  We have a group of about 16 and it gets vicious at times.  Playing out in the heat during the summer and indoors in the winter, I burn around 900-1000 calories each time we play.  That's quite a bit for someone who was a sedentary couch potato... 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

No need to join a gym @MoeFOH if you're willing to shell out a little cash for some equipment for the home.

I personally as a single parent working 5 days a week, don't have the time to get to a gym that isn't a 24/7 seedy type establishment, so I recently purchased a good quality home rower.

Every morning when I wake I row 2-3Km (When you start out even doing 1Km is a great start) and every evening I row another 3 Km. 

Rowing pretty much works out the entire body, builds muscle, sheds fat and is great cardio all in one. No stress on your joints either. 

After every work out, I have a drink of Whey Protein Isolate shake with water, not milk.

Also I found that cutting back on minor things makes a huge difference: I have never liked fizzy sugary drinks so thats easy for me, I cut out sugar from my coffee completely and just generally food proportions for dinner, I've cut that down a little. Otherwise, I eat pretty much everything I like, just being a little more sensible about it combined with my daily exercise. :)

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, MIKA27 said:

I personally as a single parent working 5 days a week, don't have the time to get to a gym that isn't a 24/7 seedy type establishment, so I recently purchased a good quality home rower.

Thinking of one of these: https://www.waterrower.com.au/au/

Know anything about them? Expensive, but seem like they'd be good. What sold you on the one you bought?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, ShortFatHokie said:

Pickleball three nights/week.  We have a group of about 16 and it gets vicious at times.  Playing out in the heat during the summer and indoors in the winter, I burn around 900-1000 calories each time we play.  That's quite a bit for someone who was a sedentary couch potato... 

Pickleball! First I've heard of it. Interesting. Now sussing it out here in Brisbane. Thanks. : )

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, mikeyjayjay said:

Walking :) It's cheap and easy on the knees plus my dog keeps me company. Once I lose a bit more weight I'll start cycling again.

I will add that you should make sure your diet is good as well.

Yep. Used to find the motivation to go walking really easily when I lived by the beach. Not so much anymore. Need to rectify that. Walking is great. : )

Link to post
Share on other sites

I work out for 45 min to an hour every day, will skip a day here and there as needed. Spend about 60% of my time doing resistance/cross training, about 40% doing cardio...running (sprints/tempo/hills mix it up), rowing, ropes, other stuff. I work out with a trainer a few days a week when I’m going really hard at it. He’ll kill me. I’m in a cycle now where I can’t not work out, even when hung over. Just automatic. Unfortunately it isn’t always like that! 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

You have to commit to yourself to achieve your goal.

If the goal is weight loss, start with your diet. Start by not always “cleaning your plate”. Drink lots of water.

If the goal is strength, you’re going to have to sweat, and challenge yourself, regularly. While it does get easier, you never want it to be easy. Stretching daily is a good start.

Approach your health regime like you do your cigar storage/aging. Once you start, you can’t stop, and expect positive results. Once you experience those positive results, you’ll become addicted to positive results.

It’s easy in this age of electronics to sit all day.

Don’t sit all day.

Eat more vegetables.

Cook food at home.

Drink lots of water.

You can do it if you want to. If you are asking about it, then you are thinking about it. Stop thinking about it, and start doing it. Don’t expect results overnight. Surprisingly, it can be fun.

Shit! Now I gotta go for a run. Thanks for reminding me!

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Another great option for inexpensive home training... TRX style suspension and or elastic band.

I have a TRX version made for Decathlon cost something like 640 nt (20 usd), you can find a lot of training styles on youtube.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Find something you enjoy doing and that way you'll look forward to doing it and doing it often. 

For me it's mountain biking.  I hit the trails 3-4 days per week (1-2 hrs each ride).  It's exciting the first time out.  And as you gain fitness and experience, your speed increases as well as the excitement.  Been at it for 8 yrs and love it now more than ever.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Rescue a dog and walk it. Or join a gym or get stationary bike. Interval training. 2 minute warm up. Followed by 2 minutes at a moderate pace. Followed by 1 1/2 minutes as hard as you can. Back to 2 minutes at moderate pace. Repeat for 7 cycles.  In 20 or 25 minutes you will get cardiopulmonary and burn fat. Research backs this.  Then do light  reps on a crunch machine. Advice from a gym nut. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I bike, swim and run, and sometimes all in the same day.  

Road biking is an great way to get started on working out.  First of all, it is not too difficult to pick, unlike swimming, and easy on your joints, unlike running.  There is also the obvious that as far as you ride out you also need to ride back, so you can easily and inadvertently get a good work out in.  Last, running and swimming can be so boring; with swimming you are looking at a pool bottom and running is just too damn slow.  Going fast on a bike certainly keeps you from getting bored ... too soon.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

No matter what program you start, you will need a minimum force of will to get over the hump.  It's there for gym programs, or simple running programs.  Competitive team sports help you past this sometimes because of the group dynamic, but the downside is that you're not going at your own pace.  The tennis courts have seen many a heart attack . . . :thinking: 

My lifetime fav for just getting in shape used to be running.  It was simple and I could just bop out my door and knock out 4 or 5 miles.  However the hump was always the first couple of miles.  Once I got to the point of comfortably doing 2-3 miles it was easy to add more miles and I worked my way up to comfortably doing 10-15 mile trail runs every weekend.  I'm not talking about the fabled "second wind."   I'm talking about a conditioning level baseline that makes it hard for newbies to get started.  Find that line and commit to breaking through it, do-or-die (tennis court . . . :whistle:whistle ), whatever it is for you it is the line that needs to be conquered.  Break through that and you can add additional conditioning at will.

When I started traveling to Asia a lot, running became much harder (terrible traffic, sidewalks, air, temps) and I converted to a gym workout.  Free weights were my favorite, done in a cardio style so you get little rest.  And I added an hour on the elliptical, which was easier than it sounds because most modern ones have TV's and I need to catch the morning news anyway.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting in shape and staying in shape are both difficult especially with life always pulling you in different directions. Working out on your own or in a gym is a personal preference but figuring out what works for you is the first step. I have done lots of hiking, individual workouts at home, gym classes, yoga  and trainers.  All worked at different times. I also adjusted diets and worked in things to help me recover, build muscle. It takes a few weeks of consistent workouts to get your body excited about working out and not fighting you. Then its just setting goals to keep you motivated. Looking good and feeling good in the activities you do helps alot in keeping you on the path. I really like it when im hiking or biking and my body wants to keep pushing instead of stopping all the time to ketch my breath. If you can find a partner to work out with that also helps make it more enjoyable. Finding enjoyment in the process is a key to not sabotaging your efforts. Remember wives love a six pack!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


Community Software by Invision Power Services, Inc.