Cuban “Twang”


Recommended Posts

I apologize if this has been discussed previously, but couldn't find any specific threads that discuss "Twang" using the search function. I have seen it referenced in a number of old posts, but no discussion of what the flavor is. I've only smoked a small sampling Cubans to date, but I have not encountered any flavors that I would refer to as "twangy". How would you describe this flavor and are there cigars that have this definitive twang to them that you can recommend? Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 96
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Mineral/earthiness that it slightly sour and a salty.

Twang is that salty/sour/citrus/tobacco flavor that is a characteristic of many Cuban cigars and which I have not found in many NC cigars. I love it. Sometimes it's subtle and very light and high, som

It tastes like plume. All cuban cigars have plume. Manure and plume. The best way I can tell is that the Cubans tend to be more plugged.

For me it's what I would describe as sort of an underlying citrus sensation (more than a flavour per se) that I experience when smoking most Cubans cigars.

Many veterans here will dismiss the idea of "twang" but I think it's just the experience (taste or sensation) that the palate detects that differentiates Cuban tobacco from non Cuban.

No one to my knowledge has ever explained or quantified it but it's obviously there imo. Its kind of like gravity biggrin.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would describe it as a slight metallic not harsh but slightly sweet. Almost like a drop of antifreeze hit your lips. In all honesty I have only experienced it a handful of times. I could not place the taste at the time, only that it was truly enjoyable.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This one has been covered, and I believe answered as well--at least as close to my personal description as I've ever seen:

The Cuban "twang" is that distictive taste characteristic that is unique to Cuban tobacco which is hard to describe other than a pleasant tart or tang flavor. It is not tasted in Dominican,Honduran or Nicaraguan tobacco because it is produced by the soil and climatic conditions that are unique to the Vuelta Abajo region. Some folks say it is an acidic taste produced by young, unaged tobacco but they are wrong because I taste it in cigars that have been aged for many years. My best example of that "distictive" flavor is in the Ramon Allones Specially Selected cigars, they just have that flavor that is pure Cuban and no other non Cuban cigar resembles their taste.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As I noted above, I would use the term "tart", a concentrated citrus-like zest. It's less of a "flavor" and more of a background "characteristic" if I could put it that way. It's separate and distinct from the "tanginess" or "lemongrass" flavors common in many cigars. I find it less prevalent overall since the late 90s.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You know what? I was just thinking about this more and why I have really only noticed it on smaller cigars, then it hit me. When I have repaired cigars in the past I have used a solution of pectin and water. The glue it creates has a very sour taste if you dip your finger in it and taste. I wonder if the "twang" some of us taste is actually a build up of pectin the rollers use?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As I noted above, I would use the term "tart", a concentrated citrus-like zest. It's less of a "flavor" and more of a background "characteristic" if I could put it that way. It's separate and distinct from the "tanginess" or "lemongrass" flavors common in many cigars. I find it less prevalent overall since the late 90s.

I wouldn't say lemongrass is tangy, an extreme tangy flavour would be akin to chewing on leather if that makes sense? Not the leather flavour, the almost sweet sour sensation on the back of the tongue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't say lemongrass is tangy, an extreme tangy flavour would be akin to chewing on leather if that makes sense? Not the leather flavour, the almost sweet sour sensation on the back of the tongue.

I agree, but I thought it may have been confusing to some. Citrus/tanginess/lemongrass are often used interchangeably or synonymously.

As far as twang, one of the things it used to remind me of is the extreme tart and zest of pure citric acid. It's just not what I would ever call a flavor--it's just the character of the tobacco. Best way I can describe it, but I can testify that I believe it does exist, although less so since the late 90s.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I always interpreted 'twang' as being a certain type of taste common to all CCs rather than describing the taste itself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some good views in this prior thread:

http://www.friendsofhabanos.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=103854

Quoting CanuckSARTech several yrs ago:

"For me, it's that certain "terroir" quality that Colt has spoken of in a past review of his.

It's this definitive "Cuban soil" taste, I guess. That's why I really enjoy Cuban coffee also, as it has a lot of these same characteristics."

Sounds right to me on reflection.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I came to the conclusion that it's what makes the immediate palpable difference between habanos and NCs. Only americans talk about that "twang", which doesn't translate in any european language…

You sophisticated Europeans.....

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of the definitions of 'twang' has to do with language ie: " the characteristic speech of a region, locality, or group of people" In America you'll often hear a southern accent referred to as a southern twang.

I always took 'twang' in a Cuban cigar to mean 'the characteristic flavor of a region' from that definition.

The unique flavor that's hard to describe, but easy to discern.

-Dan

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A complementary slightly sour and earthy note that seems to appear during the middle and end of a taste. Nothing like it in the world!

And is typically an experience of synesthesia if I haven't smoked for a few days.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I came to the conclusion that it's what makes the immediate palpable difference between habanos and NCs. Only Americans talk about that "twang", which doesn't translate in any european language…

Agree - definite difference between CC's and NC's. We yanks are a creative lot, aren't we! By the way, the word 'Americans' is a proper noun and starts with a capital A. We like that! cigar.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.

Community Software by Invision Power Services, Inc.