Current Fitness Routines?


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Working hard on the treadmill, bwana!

I just thought of an elderly gent once in the Gym. He was definitely a standout. He appeared to be in his late 70's early 80's. He would walk in, clean shoes, kakhi pant, polo shirt and a baseball hat

I work out 60 to 90 minutes, three days on, one day off, weightlifting.  I don't smoke a stogie before I work out.  I'm 59.

My current routine is as follows:

  • Monday - Leg Day
    • Squats, Deadlift, Lunges, Leg Raises, Leg Curls, Calf Press, Back Hyperextension
  • Tuesday - Arms/Abs
    • Bicep Curl with EZ-Bar, Dumbbell Tricep Extensions, Seated Dumbbell Shoulder Press, Hanging Leg Raises, Alternate Hammer Curl, Cable Triceps Pushdown, Medicine Ball Russian Twists
  • Wednesday - Rest
  • Thursday - Chest/Shoulders
    • Dumbbell Bench Press, Seated Cable Row, Dumbbell Fly, Lat Pulldowns, Chest Fly Machine, Single Arm Row, Wrist Curls
  • Friday - Run
    • Between 3 and 8 miles depending on how my leg is doing (I've had three surgeries)

Every day includes stretching for about 15-20 minutes. Also, there can be bike rides with the kids, walking the dog, mowing the lawn, etc. 

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IMHO what ever your work out routine is, that’s the problem. Routine is a killer. Variety is what keeps you/your body working the hardest. Sometimes in the gym 4 days a week, sometimes 3 days a week, sometimes heavier weights with low reps, sometimes lower weights with high reps. A lot of golf (get outside as much as possible)). Sometimes cardio, sometimes I take the week off. As a matter of fact I feel stronger (lifting weights) after a week off than any other time. At this point in life for me, it’s all about fighting atrophy. While I’m not old, I’m not a “spring chicken”. Moderate alcohol (Thurs-Sunday), enjoy a good meal (steak, fat, deep fried, whatever) just don’t do it every day. Try to knock out as much processed sugar as possible. All that to say, don’t stop living just to live. 

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Tons of great advice, tips and tricks in here from people who are far more qualified than myself. Having said that...

For me, when I have my best workouts, I'm focused on working out. I leave the phone behind (or just play music), I follow a routine with different workouts on different days, and outside of a particular injury, I stick with it until I start to feel the dreaded plateau, then I look to mix in other movements that work the muscle group but differently. So instead of a flat bench for example, maybe I mix in incline bench or something similar. Then lastly, in weights and in cardio, I limit my rest between sets or activities. This speaks to removing distractions again. The number of times I've hit a good set of some exercise, then my brain reminds me that...not to name the source of distractions...a 24:24 is about to go live, I mentally wander off and I just burnt 10 minutes in between sets and lost some of my momentum. Not good. 

I'm also a big fan of supplementing any lifting and cardio routine with an athletic endeavor. I enjoy training Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and kickboxing. As long as I'm not getting injured, the two can really complement each other, as strength and endurance are useful traits for both of those activities. 

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41 minutes ago, FatherOfPugs said:

Been lifting for 20 years, Master of Science in Kinesiology (exercise and movement science) in a former life before I became a teacher and coach, I worked with clients at the University.

My exercise routine:
Monday - Legs: Squats, Romanian Deadlifts, and calf raises; 30 minutes intense cardio

Tuesday - Upper body: Incline bench press, lat pull downs, close grip lat pull downs, dumbell curls, triceps extensions on the machine; 30 mins intense cardio

Wednesday - Deadlift day! Deadlift work sets at 85% of 1 rep max

Thursday - OFF

Friday - Upper Body: bench press, barbell rows, curls, close grip bench (triceps), and dumbell shrugs; 30 mins moderate cardio

Saturday -  Legs: leg press, calf raises, lunges, leg extension, leg curls

Sunday - Cardio: 1 hour, mix it up between stair master, ellyptical, and upright bike

Eat minimal amounts of sugar, fruits are great for a sweet tooth craving. I do have dark chocolate on hand because I do like to enjoy life.

Lots of lean meat (plenty of red and white, as well as fish) and vegetables.

Drink good alcohol, don't go bottom shelf and limit it to 1 drink per day, maybe 2 on the weekends. 

I love it man! Way to get after it!!! 

 

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I used to do a steady weights cardio etc. the usual thing you know at the gym.

But about 8 months ago I discovered Kettle bells and they have changed my life. I’m not talking about getting ripped and building muscle here. I’m talking about strength. Run up the stairs carrying your 50lb son in one arm strength.

If you’re interested. Check out a book by Pavel Tsatsoulin called Simple Sinister

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CrossFit here 3-4 times a week, 6 years and counting. Wrong side of 45yo. Drink beer regularly and crisps. If I cut just those out I start to lose weight.

Like the variety of CrossFit. I'm stronger than I've ever been with gym weights. Fitter but need to get some more running in. Don't have all the gymnastics skills. But will keep trying.

Do need to lose weight so I can get more pull-ups and dips. Back up to 92kg. Still want to try for 80. Esp after messing up the fat bastid comp.

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I’m basically a masochist and do some freaky crap in the weight room. I work out 6 days a week for about 105 minutes on average, closely track my macros and eat insanely clean. I’ve had and am currently having bad digestive issues so that’s really made me cut my diet down so sharply. What I do is certainly not for everyone, but I’m 28, and what I’m trying to become in life requires a high degree of discipline, and this is the best realm to practice discipline. 
My exact routine is: 
Monday: Chest/shoulders/abs
Tuesday: Back, bi's, abs
Wed: Shoulders, rear delts, tri's, abs
Thursday: Legs, abs
Friday: Chest, tris, abs
Saturday: pull day (RDL's and some other hamstring work, back, rear delts, bi's, abs) 
By some miracle one of the nicest gym's in the country opened up in here in the north bay area so I'm always changing up my specific lifts in terms of strength, hypertrophy, and pump, as well as type of exercises. I mainly use dumbbells, cables and machines, and not a lot of barbell work. I've implemented a ton of time under tension and eccentric tempo into my progressive overload and got amazing results from it. I've been doing a lot of sled work as well during my cut which has been amazing. 
 
One crazy thing is I think I’ve had chronic gut inflammation for years. This is the first year I’ve cut out all foods that cause inflammation and my waist is 2-3 inches leaner, even though my body fat percentage is the same as it was in the summer last year, and I currently have about 7-10 more pounds of muscle. My suit pants look pleated and barely fit anymore. If you’re struggling with health problems, research gut health. IMO it’s the cause of many problems that people face today. 
What is your current diet? Carnivore? I saw a documentary where a woman went full carnivore raw to cure her health problems. Pretty nasty. I'm mostly keto but drink too much beer and cheat alot. I balance that out with some IF here and there.

Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk

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3 hours ago, Stogiepuffer said:

What is your current diet? Carnivore? I saw a documentary where a woman went full carnivore raw to cure her health problems. Pretty nasty. I'm mostly keto but drink too much beer and cheat alot. I balance that out with some IF here and there.

Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
 

I've basically cut out everything besides fruit, veggies, quinoa, sweet potatoes, lots of healthy oils (olive, walnut, mct, avocado) and lean meats. I took 6 weeks off from drinking when my gut was really bad, and now I keep it to twice a week. I've been gluten free for 8 years and my food sensitivities were unreal when my leaky gut was bad, even rice triggered my gut pretty bad. Honestly, I wouldnt have been able to do this diet without my leaky gut symptoms, but I'm glad I did because its what rid me of my gut inflammation that apparently I've had for so long. When my gut is finally healed, I'm going to play around with foods to see what triggers what and what I digest well. I have a very sensitive digestive system to I just have to be more intense with my diet than most people. 

I do cheat once a week with In n Out, but my gut surprisingly deals with a 3x3 without issue.

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I've basically cut out everything besides fruit, veggies, quinoa, sweet potatoes, lots of healthy oils (olive, walnut, mct, avocado) and lean meats. I took 6 weeks off from drinking when my gut was really bad, and now I keep it to twice a week. I've been gluten free for 8 years and my food sensitivities were unreal when my leaky gut was bad, even rice triggered my gut pretty bad. Honestly, I wouldnt have been able to do this diet without my leaky gut symptoms, but I'm glad I did because its what rid me of my gut inflammation that apparently I've had for so long. When my gut is finally healed, I'm going to play around with foods to see what triggers what and what I digest well. I have a very sensitive digestive system to I just have to be more intense with my diet than most people. 

I do cheat once a week with In n Out, but my gut surprisingly deals with a 3x3 without issue.

Glad to hear you are looking at food for a cure vs. pills. I fixed my wife's gut issues with bone broth, probiotics, kombucha and cutting out alot of gluten.

 

Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk

 

 

 

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19 hours ago, Colt45 said:

Without knowing (obviously), it could be, as you alluded to, age.

If you've been leaning out, you might expect to see a dip in strength.

Could be overtraining / lack of recovery time. Could be cardio cutting into strength gains.

Caloric intake. None of the above  :wink2:

I'm into impersonal and dysfunctional training.....

 I am pretty sure it is aging. Pissing me off no end that I can't do what I was doing 18 months ago but it has motivated me!

interesting to see what people are doing diet wise. I do 16/8 IF daily, no cheating. Sugars out, carbs under 50g daily. It has worked well. 

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52 years old, physical outside job and eat when I'm hungry. No neat sugar, booze or white bread are my only real rules. Use a bike instead of a car at the weekend because it's easier to get around. Walk rather than cab in town. Occasional bouts of calisthenics if I'm feeling a bit unfit. Been the same weight for 30+ years which annoys the f*ck out of my wife. No idea which diet plan she's on this week.

Sent from 47171 Lempo 

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I've been active most of my life, and then I went on a lazy streak for a few years while my kids where in middle school and starting high school. I finally got back into it after a 6 year hiatus and lost significant weight. But I was just doing what came to me, I didn't follow any program. 

Up until recently I was simply alternating between cardio (either running, or elliptical) and weight/resistance training. I was pushing myself pretty hard, and on weekends I would do 8 mile runs hard, burning 1400-1500 calories. That was good and worked well for me for 10 years. More recently I made some new discoveries and have adjusted my routine.

First, I learned about the importance of intermittent fasting. Now I fast for 14-16 hours every day, usually I stop eating by 8:00pm, and then I eat again at 12:00pm the next day. This was a major shift, but it quickly became apparent that it was working and giving me much better results physically.

Next, I learned the important of alternating my training routine and pushing myself to go further and longer, but without pushing to the point of hurting. I learned that the body adjusts to any demand, but if you push yourself to the point where it hurts for the next couple of days then you have overdone it and are actually contributing to aging. So I adjusted my training slightly to more gradually push to my limits, still alternating between cardio and weight training, but keeping it more steady for 1 hour per day, 5 days per week, with two days of just light walking in thrown. Now I may get some light pain the next day but very minor.

Finally, I learned the importance of autophagy, and how to stimulate it. Our bodies have a systematic process of storing energy for when we need it. But with food being so available, and three square meals daily it hardly ever gets to tap into those reserves. Fasting helps open up those reserves so your body can use them up. This is how hunter/gatherers and foraging early sapiens lived, and that is why our bodies function like this after thousands of years of evolution. What science discovered is that exercising near the late stages of your fast accelerates the removal of bad cells through autophagy, it literally helps to regenerate new cells by devouring bad old cells. So now I exercise in the mornings after 10+ hours of fasting, and on weekends I wait 14 hours before exercise. Yes, I was weaker the first few weeks of doing this, but quickly observed the improvement in musculature and got leaner and stronger over time.

I highly recommend listening to a the Joe Rogan Experience podcast #1234, where he interviewed David Sinclair, Ph.D, a professor from Harvard doing research on longevity. He reveals a lot of this information, particularly the autophagy information. You can also find it on youtube. 

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3 hours ago, El Presidente said:

 I am pretty sure it is aging. Pissing me off no end that I can't do what I was doing 18 months ago but it has motivated me!

Perhaps easier said than done, but try to let go of the numbers. Adding poundage does show progress, but there are other ways as well. Try to make whatever weight you do use taxing. My first thought is to try and always control a movement in both the positive and negative - when doing a shoulder press for example, control pushing up, but also lowering down. There are many ways - drop sets, rest pause, etc.....

Mental focus. You start to squeeze out an extra rep or two - another sign of progress. Mental focus. Next thing you know, you're adding a kilo - it's a step. Mental focus. Stick with it, keep your mind on what you're doing. Mental focus.  :D

Regarding diet, I eat fairly simply, and do a "modified" IF 14/10 due to my overall schedule. But my first calories are not for three and a half hours or so after I wake up.

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Crossfit, but you wouldn't know it to look at me. I scale everything. I was not athletic as a kid and never worked out much until I hit my fiftieth birthday.  I use Crossfit as a HIT regime. I lift and do the metabolic workouts as best as I can but I don't do anything that hurts or is too strenuous. The variety of exercise and the group atmosphere is great. I ride my bike once or twice a week when weather permits. I hate that it's diet and exercise. That is, diet is first, exercise second. I have lots of discipline but that evening snack is a hard one for me.

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26 minutes ago, joeypots said:

Crossfit, but you wouldn't know it to look at me. I scale everything. I was not athletic as a kid and never worked out much until I hit my fiftieth birthday.  I use Crossfit as a HIT regime. I lift and do the metabolic workouts as best as I can but I don't do anything that hurts or is too strenuous. The variety of exercise and the group atmosphere is great. I ride my bike once or twice a week when weather permits. I hate that it's diet and exercise. That is, diet is first, exercise second. I have lots of discipline but that evening snack is a hard one for me.

The afternoon snacks are the worst! Even with how disciplined I am, I will fall in the evening if chips or ice cream are around. The trick to breaking the bad snacking habit is to rid your home of ALL bad snacks. Easier said than done, but if it isnt in front of you, you wont eat it! 

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I walk a lot.  Sometimes just for leisure but mostly to get around. 

I hit the gym on average 1-3 times/week.  Last month was a bit of a slump, but I'm back at 2 times per week. Mostly weight training for an hour.  With Summer here (almost) I'll add some cycling to the mix. 

I try to eat paleo as much as I can, but being Italian, the carbs are sometimes too hard to resist. :D In general I try to stop eating when I start to feel full. I reduce the amount of salty snacks I have too.  You gotta enjoy chips once in a while. :)

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3 hours ago, Colt45 said:

Mental focus. You start to squeeze out an extra rep or two - another sign of progress.

This is also an easy trap to fall in. "Got two extra reps today, I'll add more weight next time!" boom hit a long term wall again. It's so hard not to jump at the chance to add more weight, when in fact you should probably be sticking to it or even dropping 10-20 for better form and more reps. As I get older, I'm less concerned about gaining anymore mass/strength and more concerned about keeping up current strength and heart rate. So I'm actually fine with my wall that I have created for myself. As young'in though, I was overly infatuated with weight, and always hit walls.

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1 hour ago, BoliDan said:

This is also an easy trap to fall in. "Got two extra reps today, I'll add more weight next time!" boom hit a long term wall again. It's so hard not to jump at the chance to add more weight, when in fact you should probably be sticking to it or even dropping 10-20 for better form and more reps. As I get older, I'm less concerned about gaining anymore mass/strength and more concerned about keeping up current strength and heart rate. So I'm actually fine with my wall that I have created for myself. As young'in though, I was overly infatuated with weight, and always hit walls.

Thinking about weight on the bar has changed for me as I've gotten older.  I'm in my early thirties, so my monster lifts are a thing of the past.  However, 1,000 pounds in the squat rack is still the same weight, whether it's 100 lbs for 10 reps or 500 lbs for 2.  That is in some ways an over simplification, but I have found that I gain far greater benefits from  keeping a total work weight in mind, rather than weight per rep, if that makes sense.  You might try to increase your total work weight each gym session while keeping the weight on the bar the same, and when you can hit an appreciable new coal--currently I'm squatting with 225 on the bar for back squats on off days, trying to hit 10,000 lbs in 4 sets (which is 11 reps per set, and a few extra on the 4th set.  I started doing this when I burned out squatting three wheels for triples, and I'm seeing promising results.  I'm also macro-loading on my upper body exercises--on overhead press I'm only adding 25, 10, and 45 lb plates, and I won't add more weight to the bar until I can do a set of 15 reps with the previous weight--i.e. I can hit 135 lbs for 9 reps as of this morning, so I won't add weight until I put it up for 15. 

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