Impact of the new Coronavirus where you are?


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The impact of coronavirus where I am?   Hmm.  Where to begin.  Last weekend, when I left the hospital on Friday night, we had 9 cases in our ICU.  When I came in on Monday, the ICU was completely

Might be irreverent after I posted the currently existing horror scenarios back on page 1 and 2 of this thread on January 30th - ages ago in this fast developing news circle. So, to end my commen

I’m ready, come what may...  

2 hours ago, Colt45 said:

As it should be - people who are really sick should be taken care of in the hospital. Anyone with a runny nose, sore throat, cough, should just stay home.

If it is a tsunami, it won't be stopped and will have to run it's course.

As an aside, and again just on me, I'm more pissed off every day, and to be honest, equally embarrassed.

What's going to happen when some really bad plague happens? ( unless this is and we're being kept in the dark )

They are just taking care of those that are really sick. Here in Sweden, if you're not in a life threathening condition you don't get any help. Not just COVID-19 related, but pretty much anything at all. It's the healthcare system that's going to collapse and it would collapse just by the share amount of people that get it. It doesn't matter that it's mainly old people and people that are already sick that get it. They still need treatment, right? And you don't have an infinite number of sick beds.

This is really bad, not just in a we all will die screaming in pain kind of way. I think most of Europe known for a month, month and a half that it's bad, you've been told until last week that it's a flu.

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We always keep a little cash in our home safe. Gave our daughter and her husband 2K and went by the bank today to cash a check and replace what we took out. Well when I  went in they were out of cash, told me that as soon as they received a shipment of money it was flying out the door. Went to another branch and was able to replace the 2K. Doesn't bode well when a bank can't cash a check for a couple of grand.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, benfica_77 said:

This is deadly serious. Self-isolate and make sure you stay positive. Meditate, workout from home regularly. Build a routine and reach out to friends, family or me! If you need to talk. 

Here are some helpful links on ways to workout out at home with little to no equipment. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MRNjTr6xrE&list=PLvJSNTaFRsEH7BJ9c0EOe5oftAS2Gs1_U&index=4&t=0s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FGsnp5yapD4&list=PLvJSNTaFRsEH7BJ9c0EOe5oftAS2Gs1_U&index=2&t=0s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vc1E5CfRfos&list=PLvJSNTaFRsEH7BJ9c0EOe5oftAS2Gs1_U&index=3&t=0s

 

Here's another. Especially useful if you live in a small space or don't have equipment.

https://www.bodypusher.com/prison-workouts/

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17 minutes ago, TBird55 said:

We always keep a little cash in our home safe. Gave our daughter and her husband 2K and went by the bank today to cash a check and replace what we took out. Well when I  went in they were out of cash, told me that as soon as they received a shipment of money it was flying out the door. Went to another branch and was able to replace the 2K. Doesn't bode well when a bank can't cash a check for a couple of grand.

 

 

1 hour ago, tigger said:

...the media and the fear they're fomenting are more dangerous than the virus...

 

 

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1 hour ago, benfica_77 said:
Lifespan
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My COVID-19 update - March 18th 


By David A Sinclair 

I feel I have an obligation as a scientist to cut through the politics and shallow reporting. In this time of uncertainty, it is more important than ever to base our views and decisions on facts, and to tell the truth, even if it is hard to hear. Let’s be clear: I’m not an epidemiologist, immunologist, or an MD. I do, however, have an unusual body of experience that I am trying to bring to bear. My Ph.D. is in genetics and microbiology. I co-founded and am the chief scientific advisor to a company that detects viruses called Arc-Bio. I can understand, filter, and interpret biological and medical literature more than most. I also have a network of doctors, CEOs, and scientists that I consult with as new data emerges. 

I will be sending out updates via this newsletter and on social media on what I read in credible scientific publications from around the world, with my interpretation of what seems to work, whether the virus is changing, what you can do to stay safe, and what the future holds.

The next few weeks are going to be bad, folks. Here’s what experts from Stanford on the front-lines predict: peak COVID-19 cases will not be until July 2020, with a total number of deaths in the USA ranging from 500,000 to 1 million. That’s sobering.

If we had instituted a nationwide lockdown last week, we may have seen infections die down over the next 2 months, as happened in Hubei province and across China. Similarly, Singapore, South Korea, and Hong Kong brought their cases to manageable levels through social isolation and mass testing in the 100s of thousands of people. Many of them even before they had symptoms. Singapore sent every citizen masks and every carrier was followed by five people. 

The three main tests are: 

  1. Test for the viral RNA (so-called PCR tests) 
  2. A 15-minute antibody test for the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein which is less reliable (89% sensitive).
  3. The third type of test is “DNA sequencing” which will be important to track the evolution of the virus and detect co-infections that make the condition worse, like flu, colds, and bacteria called pneumococci that cause bacterial pneumonia.

But the US, Europe, and Australia are not like China, and certainly not Singapore. Most leaders are currently reluctant to issue draconian blanket orders. They worry about the effect on small businesses. They worry many people don’t have health insurance. They worry about the dwindling cash reserves of companies and individuals. 

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Data from March 15th that looks at how containment gets harder every day we delay. Source: Ben Kuhn and Yuri Vishnevsky on ObservableHQ

What should we expect from here? 

At first, I was worried about reinfection. Rumors out of China said this might be possible. New studies in monkeys suggest this is extremely unlikely. That’s very good news for humanity. But there will be a lot of pain for the rest of the year. There may be a repurposing of hotels to be intensive care units (ICUs) in the coming weeks. The governor of California says don’t expect kids to go back to school this year. Hospitals are starting to look like a scene from M*A*S*H, with tents outside and long lines of people waiting for testing. No visitors allowed. All non-essential operations are postponed. There are very few infectious disease doctors at each hospital, sleeping from midnight to 4 AM, walking around wards in what look like spacesuits. ICUs are already in chaos in major cities. And this is an early stage. What happens a few weeks from now?

This is why scenes from Florida of youths continuing to party and congregate are extremely worrying. Many of them will unwittingly carry the virus back to their friends and families. Unless there’s a lockdown of all of us for two months at least, except for essential staff, the viral spread will continue at high rates and will continue to overwhelm hospitals. Beds, ventilators, and nurses will be in short supply. Hospital staff will contract COVID-19. Already, the number of nurses has been on the decline for years. When hospitals run out of ventilator machines, then, like Italy, doctors will have to make heart-wrenching decisions who to help and who to let die. While this may not sound that bad, imagine it’s your parent or grandparent who is denied the ventilator. 

As I write this, my friend Dr. Peter Attia just received word from an ICU doctor at a small NY hospital that they are officially out of ventilators and are doubling up ventilators to keep 2 patients alive with one machine.

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I saw this tweet in response to a warning NY Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio Cortez gave to young people about staying inside. This person's response had politically motivated undertones. This is not about politics. We need young people to come together to help protect our most vulnerable. We are all in this together.

I am often asked, “How do I know I’m infected?”  Based on formal accounts out of China and Australia, in the first few days of infection you probably won’t know you have it. You will be leaving a trail of viral particles at home, on food, on elevator buttons, or at the grocery store or restaurant. Droplets, skin contact, surfaces, and food seem to be how it’s transmitted. 

Fomites (surfaces that spread disease) can infect you 24-96 hours after someone has contaminated it, depending on whether it is steel or plastic. Droplets from breath can stay in the air for 30 minutes before falling to the ground. If you can smell someone’s breath, say if they had recently smoked or ate garlic, you can be infected. Think of these droplets like they were a fog.

Coronaviruses usually cause mild to moderate upper-respiratory tract illnesses, like the common cold. However, three times in this century coronavirus outbreaks have emerged from animal reservoirs to cause severe disease and global transmission concerns, SARS (2002-4), MERS (2012 and remains in camels) and COVID-19 (2019, with the greatest similarity to bat coronaviruses). Why they are emerging now and not last century is not clear but theories include climate change and greater human-wild animal contact, as more humans push further into virgin forests and use “bush meat” for food.

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) usually begins like you are getting a cold. You will have a dry, raspy throat. Maybe a headache. You may have a dry (but not wet) cough. You almost certainly won’t be sneezing (that’s the common cold). Within days, you’ll feel like you’ve got the flu, with a high fever, aches and pains. Sometimes you can feel like you are recovering - until the pneumonia starts. 

That’s when your lungs can’t get enough oxygen and you develop crepitance, when your lungs crackle because there’s not enough surfactant (biological detergents). Think of a balloon that’s wet on the inside. Because the virus also attacks the heart, pericarditis can also occur in the late stages, leading to cardiogenic shock and death due to cardiac arrest. Other organs that get attacked are the kidney and gut. Even the lining of blood vessels.

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Cumulative global coronavirus cases.
Source: The Wall Street Journal

As of today, March 18th, more than 8000 people globally have died. There are more than 200,000 confirmed cases in at least 146 countries/territories, according to the World Health Organization. 

Fatality rates vacillate between 0.7% and 6% depending on the number of tests that are taken and the number of critical care units still available in the region. The R0, the number of people a carrier infects, is between 2 to 4. That means that for every 1 person that contracts the virus, 2 to 4 will become infected. 

In the US, we expect a doubling of cases every six days. That means we are looking at about 1 million cases by the end of April.

Then 2 million by May 7.

Then 4 million by May 13.

 

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The Workers Who Face the Greatest Coronavirus Risk - Credit The New York Times. Loggers face the least risk while health care workers are at greatest risk.

We are no longer able to wipe this virus off the face of the planet by containment, so currently, the strategy is two-fold — flatten and delay:

1. We need to flatten the curve rate of infection to help ease the pressure on our healthcare system. We need young people especially to help us fight this by staying inside and self quarantining. 

2. Somewhere between 33% and 75% of us will catch this disease, unless we can delay it until a vaccine trial is successful, which is another 18 months away, assuming it does work. I am hopeful but, until then, we have to live with corona. 

Ultimately, we will get to what’s called a “herd immunity”. That means that enough of us have developed a resistance to COVID-19 that the R0 is less than one. When that happens, the virus should eventually peter out. 

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How to “flatten the curve” - Source: The Washington Post

What seems to work is chloroquine, also known as Planiquil, a malarial drug doctors in China showed in small trials did help (though this is now apparently questioned by doctors in the USA). 

There’s a 50% chance remdevisir, an investigational broad-spectrum antiviral treatment from Giliead Pharmaceuticals, which seemed to limit MERS symptoms in animal tests, will also help COVID-19 patients. Trials began on Feb 25th at the University of Nebraska, Omaha, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. Results will likely be known in a few months. In the meantime, doctors are prescribing remdevisir off-label.

Treatments that doctors say don’t work are colloidal silver, ganciclovir and related antivirals, anti-inflammatory steroids such as prednisolone, and there’s new caution out of France being placed on ibuprofen, which is said to make symptoms worse. Acetaminophen, which is not an anti-inflammatory, seems fine to use at home, but not in large amounts and never should be taken with alcohol. 

Tamiflu seems to suppress the virus' reproduction in at least some cases which are somewhat surprising as Tamiflu was designed to target an enzyme on the influenza virus, not on coronaviruses. A test vaccine for the first SARS virus that targeted the corona spike protein actually backfired and made infected monkeys worse, so doctors have to be careful when testing new COVID-19 vaccines on humans, especially because most target the spike protein.

Other drugs under investigation include Kaletra, Aluvia, Prezcobix, Truvada, PegIntron, Sylatron, Xofluza, Kevzara, Galidesivir, Ganovo, Bevacizumab, recombinant ACE2, PD-1-blocking antibody, thymosin, placenta-based cell therapy, and a CCR5 antagonist, along with more than 40 vaccine trials globally.

Humanity is fighting back!

Love David Sinclair!!

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31 minutes ago, Cubadust said:

 It's the healthcare system that's going to collapse and it would collapse just by the share amount of people that get it.

But why? If the vast majority who get it have relatively minor symptoms  ( and that's how it's been reported it will manifest ) and don't need hospital treatment, with only a serious minority needing hospital beds, why will things collapse?

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1 minute ago, Colt45 said:

But why? If the vast majority who get it have relatively minor symptoms  ( and that's how it's been reported it will manifest ) and don't need hospital treatment, with only a serious minority needing hospital beds, why will things collapse?

Because there aren't enough beds in hospitals to care for those who will need it. 

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/18/cuomo-says-trump-is-dispatching-a-floating-hospital-to-new-york-state.html

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6 minutes ago, cbaty08 said:

Because there aren't enough beds in hospitals to care for those who will need it. 
 

Perhaps, but we won't know until it actually happens - regardless of what we read on the internet.

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Just now, cbaty08 said:

Go ahead and read this MIT article, and let me know what you think afterward, Colt45. :)
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/615370/coronavirus-pandemic-social-distancing-18-months/

I took a nice walk this afternoon. A sunny, beautiful March day (albeit a little chilly by the ocean) Really busy, plenty of people enjoying themselves. I'm done with the scaremongers. I've said what I've had to say. It's nothing more than what I feel.

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By Jeremy Young:  (professor at a University in Utah)
 
 
We can now read the report on COVID-19 that so terrified every public health manager and head of state from Boris Johnson to Donald Trump to the dictator of El Salvador that they ordered people to stay in their houses. I read it yesterday afternoon and haven't been the same since. I urge everyone to read it, but maybe have a drink first, or have your family around you. It is absolutely terrifying. The New York TImes confirms that the CDC and global leaders are treating it as factual.
 
Here's a brief rundown of what I'm seeing in here. Please correct me in comments if I'm wrong.
 
The COVID-19 response team at Imperial College in London obtained what appears to be the first accurate dataset of infection and death rates from China, Korea, and Italy. They plugged those numbers into widely available epidemic modeling software and ran a simulation: what would happen if the United States did absolutely nothing -- if we treated COVID-19 like the flu, went about business as usual, and let the virus take its course?
 
Here's what would happen: 80% of Americans would get the disease. 0.9% of them would die. Between 4 and 8 percent of all Americans over the age of 70 would die. 2.2 million Americans would die from the virus itself.
 
It gets worse. Most people who are in danger of dying from COVID-19 need to be put on ventilators. 50% of those put on ventilators still die, but the other 50% live. But in an unmitigated epidemic, the need for ventilators would be 30 times the number of ventilators in the United States. Virtually no one who needed a ventilator would get one. 100% of patients who need ventilators would die if they didn't get one. So the actual death toll from the virus would be closer to 4 million Americans -- in a span of 3 months. 8-15% of all Americans over 70 would die.
 
How many people is 4 million Americans? It's more Americans than have died all at once from anything, ever. It's the population of Los Angeles. It's four times the number of Americans who died in the Civil War...on both sides combined. It's two-thirds as many people as died in the Holocaust.
 
Americans make up 4.4% of the world's population. So if we simply extrapolate these numbers to the rest of the world -- now we're getting into really fuzzy estimates, so the margin of error is pretty great here -- this gives us 90 million deaths globally from COVID-19. That's 15 Holocausts. That's 1.5 times as many people as died in World War II, over 12 years. This would take 3-6 months.
 
Now, it's unrealistic to assume that countries wouldn't do ANYTHING to fight the virus once people started dying. So the Imperial College team ran the numbers again, this time assuming a "mitigation" strategy. A mitigation strategy is pretty much what common sense would tell us to do: America places all symptomatic cases of the disease in isolation. It quarantines their families for 14 days. It orders all Americans over 70 to practice social distancing. This is what you've seen a lot of people talking about when they say we should "flatten the curve": try to slow the spread of the disease to the people most likely to die from it, to avoid overwhelming hospitals.
 
And it does flatten the curve -- but not nearly enough. The death rate from the disease is cut in half, but it still kills 1.1 million Americans all by itself. The peak need for ventilators falls by two-thirds, but it still exceeds the number of ventilators in the US by eight times, meaning most people who need ventilators still don't get them. That leaves the actual death toll in the US at right around 2 million deaths. The population of Houston. Two civil wars. One-third of the Holocaust. Globally, 45 million people die: 7.5 Holocausts, 3/4 of World War II. That's what happens if we use common sense: the worst death toll from a single cause since the Middle Ages.
 
Finally, the Imperial College team ran the numbers a third time, this time assuming a "suppression" strategy. In addition to isolating symptomatic cases and quarantining their family members, they also simulated social distancing for the entire population. All public gatherings and most workplaces shut down. Schools and universities close. (Note that these simulations assumed a realistic rate of adherence to these requirements, around 70-75% adherence, not that everyone follows them perfectly.) This is basically what we are seeing happen in the United States today.
 
This time it works! The death rate in the US peaks three weeks from now at a few thousand deaths, then goes down. We hit, but don't exceed (at least not by very much), the number of available ventilators. The nightmarish death tolls from the rest of the study disappear; COVID-19 goes down in the books as a bad flu instead of the Black Death.
 
But here's the catch: if we EVER relax these requirements before a vaccine is administered to the entire population, COVID-19 comes right back and kills millions of Americans in a few months, the same as before. The simulation does indicate that, after the first suppression period (lasting from now until July), we could probably lift restrictions for a month, followed by two more months of suppression, in a repeating pattern without triggering an outbreak or overwhelming the ventilator supply. If we staggered these suppression breaks based on local conditions, we might be able to do a bit better. But we simply cannot ever allow the virus to spread throughout the entire population in the way other viruses do, because it is just too deadly. If lots of people we know end up getting COVID-19, it means millions of Americans are dying. It simply can't be allowed to happen.
 
How quickly will a vaccine be here? Already, medical ethics have been pushed to the limit to deliver one. COVID-19 was first discovered a few months ago. Last week, three separate research teams announced they had developed vaccines. Yesterday, one of them (with FDA approval) injected its vaccine into a live person, without waiting for animal testing. Now, though, they have to monitor the test subject for fourteen months to make sure the vaccine is safe. This is the part of the testing that can't be rushed: the plan is to inoculate the entire human population, so if the vaccine itself turned out to be lethal for some reason, it could potentially kill all humans, which is a lot worse than 90 million deaths. Assuming the vaccine is safe and effective, it will still take several months to produce enough to inoculate the global population. For this reason, the Imperial College team estimated it will be about 18 months until the vaccine is available.
 
During those 18 months, things are going to be very difficult and very scary. Our economy and our society will be disrupted in profound ways. Worst of all, if the suppression policies actually work, it will feel like we are doing all this for nothing, because the infection and death rates will be very low. It's easy to get people to come together in common sacrifice in the middle of a war. It's very hard to get them to do so in a pandemic that looks invisible precisely because suppression methods are working. But that's exactly what we're going to have to do.
 
 
Keep Safe!!!!
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6 minutes ago, Colt45 said:

Perhaps, but we won't know until it actually happens - regardless of what we read on the internet.

But it's already happening, maybe not in your city but elsewhere. You think what's been happening in Italy and now Spain and France are just internet rumors? You don't think the hospitals were full even before this virus? For example, they found 5 blood clots (don't know the exact english term for it but I'm sure you understand) in my dad, 3 in his legs and 2 in the groin area. This was back in october and he was told they should find him a time to do "simple" surgery around new years, it was urgent but no emergency. He doesn't get any fresh blood to his legs so he can't walk for more than 5 minutes. He finally were told last week that he got his slot, now on the 24th. He went there yesterday to meet the doctors and were told that they can't do anything now because they have to treat all the corona patients plus people with serious problems, like heart and lung patients. He was told to call them if his foot started to turn black. You think he's the only one here that need surgery that's on hold now?

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Cubadust...sounds like your dad has peripheral vascular disease...in most hospital systems (especially socialized medical systems) that means it’s an elective procedure unless there’s obvious ischemia/infarction and gangrene (thus the black foot comment). Unfortunately in a crisis situation or over stressed hospital system if ischemia develops that treatment usually ends up in amputation. In a crisis or socialized overstressed hospital system urgent conditions aren’t treated until they are an emergent condition. Unfortunately in the case of a pandemic and impending bed shortages even urgent cases take a back burner, even in the best hospital systems. A patient with peripheral vascular disease is more likely to need an ICU bed even after a relatively minor procedure (I assume they were planning angioplasty over bypass). 
 

so for now the vast majority of elective procedures are being deferred even further to keep icu and critical care beds open in anticipation of an oncoming onslaught. In a pandemic/crisis situation the medical community has to revert to triage.  It’s unfortunate and in a better situation your dad would have been treated already. Really rough situation.
 

Best of luck

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On the treatment front there's also Favipiravir, which was developed in Japan to treat influenza but shows promise in COVID-19 and is being put in accelerated clinical trials.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/18/japanese-flu-drug-clearly-effective-in-treating-coronavirus-says-china

I suspect that reasonably effective treatment options are going to be a practical factor in fighting this quite a bit faster than a vaccine (which is still likely 12-18 months away in even optimistic scenarios, no matter what politicians say).  If you can flatten the curve enough to prevent hospitals from being overwhelmed (which requires mandated social distancing which also tanks the economy, unfortunately) and effectively treat most of the serious cases, that's a good start.

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24 minutes ago, Euripidespants said:

Cubadust...sounds like your dad has peripheral vascular disease...in most hospital systems (especially socialized medical systems) that means it’s an elective procedure unless there’s obvious ischemia/infarction and gangrene (thus the black foot comment). Unfortunately in a crisis situation or over stressed hospital system if ischemia develops that treatment usually ends up in amputation. In a crisis or socialized overstressed hospital system urgent conditions aren’t treated until they are an emergent condition. Unfortunately in the case of a pandemic and impending bed shortages even urgent cases take a back burner, even in the best hospital systems. A patient with peripheral vascular disease is more likely to need an ICU bed even after a relatively minor procedure (I assume they were planning angioplasty over bypass). 
 

so for now the vast majority of elective procedures are being deferred even further to keep icu and critical care beds open in anticipation of an oncoming onslaught. In a pandemic/crisis situation the medical community has to revert to triage.  It’s unfortunate and in a better situation your dad would have been treated already. Really rough situation.
 

Best of luck

Our hospitals are rushing to get as many elective surgeries done before they are inundated with coronavirus patients.

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw-hospital-elective-surgery-blitz-before-coronavirus-crunch-20200317-p54aw4.html

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Severa treatment options are being proposed and tried. One of the more interesting responses has been the response to chloroquine, an old anti-malarial drug. Preliminary responses have been promising.

keep in mind...one of the most lethal viruses known to man, if not the most lethal...we had a non vaccinated survivor for the firsts time in history by blasting the patient with antiviral drugs created in the last 20 years in response to HIV/AIDS. Those a drugs are being proven to work against multiple viruses even though they were developed against retroviruses 

 

edit to clarify...was talking about rabies in the last paragraph. The fact that we had a rabies survivor is a massive medical accomplishment 

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this is really worth watching. 

this guy is one of the real experts – an American public-health scientist and a biosecurity and infectious-disease expert, the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, a Regents Professor, the McKnight Presidential Endowed Chair in Public Health, a Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, a professor in the Technological Leadership Institute, College of Science and Engineering, and lots more, so has a fair degree of expertise. 

 

 

e.

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36 minutes ago, Ken Gargett said:

this is really worth watching. 

this guy is one of the real experts – an American public-health scientist and a biosecurity and infectious-disease expert, the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, a Regents Professor, the McKnight Presidential Endowed Chair in Public Health, a Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, a professor in the Technological Leadership Institute, College of Science and Engineering, and lots more, so has a fair degree of expertise. 

 

 

e.

There's a 90 minute Joe Rogan podcast that goes into deeper detail. Very good. 

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11 hours ago, Silverstix said:

Overheard 2 coworkers in the office this morning - one of them has 2 college aged kids at home who both have fevers and are "sick".....and this woman decides its a good idea to come to work??? After I made a big stink about it, they sent her home.  I swear, if the government ever ends up stepping in and mandating a lock down, it's because we are complete morons who can't be trusted to have any common sense whatsoever and we need to be saved from ourselves.

Sadly I keep hearing talk like this is overblown, and even a hoax. Common sense , is well.....

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I'm not sure if this is a violation of human rights or just simply funny 

Also apparently, (with a bucket of salt) China was able to report 0 new local cases today, for the first time since the start of the crisis. 

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16 hours ago, helix said:

Cuban government is doing nothing , it is going to hit very hard in Cuba.

https://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/cuba/article241223066.html

Ya, I have a facebook group im in for resorts I like in Cuba....People are still going, and posting pics, like its all great. Are you f Ing serious?? I wouldn't go if its free.!

 

14 hours ago, tigger said:

What's going on is something that should be taken very seriously, but I'm beginning to suspect that the media and the fear they're fomenting are more dangerous than the virus...

I think a lot of it is, a tleast to some is, the media is always making something out of nothing. So as a result, they think this is the same. I have some American friends, and so many(not all) of them think this is just fabricated to make Trump look bad. I feel bad as I think they are going to get hit bad, and they don't even see it coming.Even here in Canada, I can't count how many people think its all over blown. A lot are coming around, but wow...do a little reading and its BAD. I'm not a doom and gloom kind of guy, but I knew back in Jan. this had a very good chance of a bad storm blowing in. The Wife did some eye rolling for awhile, but she sure sees the big pic now. I should have recorded when she told me how right I was?

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Yesterday work said business as usual as a city worker we were essential services. Today we were told we are alternating every other week for at least 3 weeks. The week we work will be a 5 hour work day basically a half day. We still have to be ready to come in so we are basically on standby. So no drinking, drugs, or weed. I have a feeling this will be extended. 

*Los Angeles area. 

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