Your Favourite Grape Right Now?


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8 hours ago, Wookie said:

Tonight’s lineup: lafite ‘60, ‘61, ‘66. haut brion ‘59....might be a bit oxidized ?

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so how did they go? spectacular line up but the condition looks pretty terrible, that 66 might work. possibly the 59. imagine what that line up is worth if good condition!!

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Tonight’s lineup: lafite ‘60, ‘61, ‘66. haut brion ‘59....might be a bit oxidized ?  

It’s been Nebbiolo for many years now. These are among the ones I'm pulling out to drink now. The 96s, 99s, 01s are still buried for future consumption.   

@SirVantes cor, nice. Old world Pinot Noir for me. Burgundy.

31 minutes ago, Ken Gargett said:

so how did they go? spectacular line up but the condition looks pretty terrible, that 66 might work. possibly the 59. imagine what that line up is worth if good condition!!

Clearly you have a good eye. These are pure undrinkable collectibles scavaged from friends cellars over the years. I agree that maybe a couple might be drinkable but I doubt it, I just wanted to post some pics of nice old stuff. The BOTL who posted the 1989 Leoville las cases I would be interested in hearing from...I've drunk gallons of that stuff and St Julien is probably my favorite commune from bordeaux. I'm still looking for suggestions from you current oenophiles as to what is good in the $20-30/ btl range. 

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5 minutes ago, Wookie said:

Clearly you have a good eye. These are pure undrinkable collectibles scavaged from friends cellars over the years. I agree that maybe a couple might be drinkable but I doubt it, I just wanted to post some pics of nice old stuff. The BOTL who posted the 1989 Leoville las cases I would be interested in hearing from...I've drunk gallons of that stuff and St Julien is probably my favorite commune from bordeaux. I'm still looking for suggestions from you current oenophiles as to what is good in the $20-30/ btl range. 

the $20 to $30 range depends on where you are located. very different for us downunder. locals would be way more use.

the pic i liked was the barolos. some great wines there. 

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8 hours ago, Tstew75 said:

I'm def not speaking of unicorn wines here, just in general

I’m not usually a big fan of supporting unicorns but Rougeard makes the best wines out of that region, hands down. (For my palate) Thierry Germain and others do great, sophisticated things - Rougeard 

 

6 hours ago, Wookie said:

Clearly you have a good eye. These are pure undrinkable collectibles scavaged from friends cellars over the years. I agree that maybe a couple might be drinkable but I doubt it, I just wanted to post some pics of nice old stuff. The BOTL who posted the 1989 Leoville las cases I would be interested in hearing from...I've drunk gallons of that stuff and St Julien is probably my favorite commune from bordeaux. I'm still looking for suggestions from you current oenophiles as to what is good in the $20-30/ btl range. 

The 89 was fresh as could be for a wine of such age. Still very primary on the fruit with resolved tannin and a purity of fruit that wws scrumptious.   In a great place right now. 
 

Also had a Fourrier 2013 Clos St.  Jacques that was kicking butt...and a 2013 Coche Meursault Village and a 2017 PYCM Corton Meursault Charmes.  All showed up thankfully. 

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Whatever hasn't been snapped up yet by panic buyers .... 
;-( 

In seriousness: for me, the world of wine is like the world of cigars.  So much variety to discover, so little time.  And the best wines are like the best cigars, they depend on the company and the mood and what I pair them with.  That said, my general rule is to drink local.  I would not order a Coonawarra in the Hunter Valley, or a Barolo in Bordeaux.  

But if I had to pick one desert island grape, it would have to be Pinot Noir from Burgundy, made by one of the old-school winemakers.  Something that becomes drinkable after 10  years, good after 20 years, and bloody mind-blowing after 30....

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6 hours ago, gweilgi said:

But if I had to pick one desert island grape, it would have to be Pinot Noir from Burgundy, made by one of the old-school winemakers.  Something that becomes drinkable after 10  years, good after 20 years, and bloody mind-blowing after 30....

Good choice and would be one of my picks. 

I'd next pick Terrantez (Madeira) as my next desert island grape if Burgundy was already claimed.

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There’s no doubt that the finest wine experiences of my life have been with old red Burgundy (some of the real old school cats put 5-30% grenache in)

 

but for newer wines Northern Rhone and Rayas (chateau des tours, etc) deliver way more pleasure young for way less money

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Keep on trying as much as I can but my happy place is definitely Sangiovese.  100% works but I find it really sings with some Cabernet (Sauv or Franc) blended in.  Tignanello would be my favourite expression but find as long as we are talking above 80% Sangiovese it will work for me!  Finding the heavy oak many new world producers are favouring is not my cup of tea.  Similar to cigars, I find I have a more 'old-world' palate.

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3 hours ago, Schumi5 said:

Keep on trying as much as I can but my happy place is definitely Sangiovese.  100% works but I find it really sings with some Cabernet (Sauv or Franc) blended in.  Tignanello would be my favourite expression but find as long as we are talking above 80% Sangiovese it will work for me!  Finding the heavy oak many new world producers are favouring is not my cup of tea.  Similar to cigars, I find I have a more 'old-world' palate.

Interesting.  While I agree that the New World can like its oak a bit too much, I do find that Italian grapes grown in Australia tend to be far lighter than their Italian cousins.  Aussie Sangiovese has disappointed me time and again, ditto Nebbiolo.  But then, despite strenuous efforts I have not managed to work my way through all that this country has to offer so I am open to being pleasantly surprised!  

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7 hours ago, wine_junkie said:

There’s no doubt that the finest wine experiences of my life have been with old red Burgundy (some of the real old school cats put 5-30% grenache in)

 

but for newer wines Northern Rhone and Rayas (chateau des tours, etc) deliver way more pleasure young for way less money

love to know where you are buying your rayas if it falls in the 'way less money' category. less than drc, roumier, leroy etc but not that many more.

rayas is also a brilliant ageing wine. opened one of my last 89s a few months ago. fabulous. the other grenache producer i absolutely love is henri bonneau but sadly he is no longer with us. 

i know there have been lots of rumours about the use of grenache (and algerian wine) in burgundy and i have no doubt that it probably once happened but i can find no evidence, including from talking to a lot of burg makers, that it has happened for a very very long time and even then was not practiced by the good producers. all i have spoken with insist it was simply bulking up wines for profit from the less reputable makers. if you have any evidence to the contrary, love to see it. has been something that has long fascinated me. 

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37 minutes ago, Ken Gargett said:

love to know where you are buying your rayas if it falls in the 'way less money' category. less than drc, roumier, leroy etc but not that many more.

rayas is also a brilliant ageing wine. opened one of my last 89s a few months ago. fabulous. the other grenache producer i absolutely love is henri bonneau but sadly he is no longer with us. 

i know there have been lots of rumours about the use of grenache (and algerian wine) in burgundy and i have no doubt that it probably once happened but i can find no evidence, including from talking to a lot of burg makers, that it has happened for a very very long time and even then was not practiced by the good producers. all i have spoken with insist it was simply bulking up wines for profit from the less reputable makers. if you have any evidence to the contrary, love to see it. has been something that has long fascinated me. 

? on the Rayas which is why I threw in the Chateau des Tours Cotes du Rhone Reserve which is $32-38 and about 80% of Rayas flavor profile and delicious young.  One of the only CdP’s I like. 
 

I have no concrete proof besides my taste buds and the heavy taste evidence from the somm at Bern’s Steakhous (not sure if you’re familiar with the spot but had one of the largest wine cellars in the world. Crazy, crazy back wines...Margaux, Lafite, Montrose back to the late 1800’s...insane collection of red Burg from the 40’s forward, etc)

 

Specifically remember a 71 Jean Marie Roumier (not under his label) burg that had that Grenache profile. 
 

Rayas is one of those wines I still love young In colder years. More aromatics and less extraction (2006, etc). Same with Pignan. At times Pignan in the warmer years...the wine drinkers Rayas. 

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4 hours ago, gweilgi said:

Interesting.  While I agree that the New World can like its oak a bit too much, I do find that Italian grapes grown in Australia tend to be far lighter than their Italian cousins.  Aussie Sangiovese has disappointed me time and again, ditto Nebbiolo.  But then, despite strenuous efforts I have not managed to work my way through all that this country has to offer so I am open to being pleasantly surprised!  

You bring up a very good point of clarification.  I meant Italian Sangiovese primarily from Tuscany. Like you, I have tried Sangiovese from some newer regions, even here in Canada and they bear no resemblance to the Tuscan grape.  I find even Sangiovese grown in Southern Italy to be quite different and not in a way that suits my palate.

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1 hour ago, wine_junkie said:

? on the Rayas which is why I threw in the Chateau des Tours Cotes du Rhone Reserve which is $32-38 and about 80% of Rayas flavor profile and delicious young.  One of the only CdP’s I like. 
 

I have no concrete proof besides my taste buds and the heavy taste evidence from the somm at Bern’s Steakhous (not sure if you’re familiar with the spot but had one of the largest wine cellars in the world. Crazy, crazy back wines...Margaux, Lafite, Montrose back to the late 1800’s...insane collection of red Burg from the 40’s forward, etc)

 

Specifically remember a 71 Jean Marie Roumier (not under his label) burg that had that Grenache profile. 
 

Rayas is one of those wines I still love young In colder years. More aromatics and less extraction (2006, etc). Same with Pignan. At times Pignan in the warmer years...the wine drinkers Rayas. 

was familiar with pignan before i ever got a chance to try pignan. but i'd always take rayas.

know what you mean with the grenache profile but i know a lot of local winemakers who talk about the similarities. unless i had actual evidence, i'd be inclined to give them the benefit of the doubt but who knows what some people will do. 

saw some stunning 71s. the romanee conti was the wine which flicked the switch for me. mindboggling. it was the greatest wine i had ever seen till a friend opened the 29. 

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1 hour ago, Ken Gargett said:

was familiar with pignan before i ever got a chance to try pignan. but i'd always take rayas.

know what you mean with the grenache profile but i know a lot of local winemakers who talk about the similarities. unless i had actual evidence, i'd be inclined to give them the benefit of the doubt but who knows what some people will do. 

saw some stunning 71s. the romanee conti was the wine which flicked the switch for me. mindboggling. it was the greatest wine i had ever seen till a friend opened the 29. 

No doubt. I give them the benefit of the doubt but there were a couple wines that were super grenach-ee. 
 

50’s and 60’s were some of my absolute favorites.  Leroy especially...I think she consistently makes the best red Burgundy in existence. 
 

Had some 60’s and 70’s Cali Pinot that would blow your mind. 

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6 hours ago, wine_junkie said:

Had some 60’s and 70’s Cali Pinot that would blow your mind. 

BV and Inglenook were easy to find for a while, but that ship has since sailed.

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On 3/13/2020 at 10:30 PM, Kitchen said:

Same here, I have to go with a good Pinot Noir, not too heavily oaked, followed by a Chardonnay.  

I did just get back from a trip to Oz and spent 4 days in the Yarra Valley, and tasted some great wines.  I highly recommend a visit if you ever go to Melbourne.  Out of all the ones I tasted though, the one that stood out was a dessert wine, which I rarely drink.  The De Bortoli "Old Boys" 21 Year Old Tawny was just amazing.  Just sweet enough and the toffee and caramel flavor was out of the park.    

I wish we in the USA could get some of these wines.  Apparently there is a 30% export tax per bottle price Oz puts on the wine industry if they want to ship outside the country, which keeps many wineries from exporting.  It was a rather sore topic at the handful of wineries I asked why they dont export.  

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Nice line up there. I always have a bottle or two of De Bortoli Old Boys tawny at home. Not only is it one of my favourites (and first tawny I ever had), the name also has an extra meaning for me. Graduates from my high school are known as "Old Boys".

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I don't drink a ton of wine.  I usually stick to Cabs and Pinot Noirs.  Just like when it comes to food I am a trash panda and will try anything so if I am with a group I will drink whatever bottle they decide to order.   But if I am going to pair with a cigar I have been really enjoying a bottle or Port I got from a vineyard in Michigan where I have relatives.   It has a ton of cherry notes.   It probably helps to have a bit of extra sugar since I am a bit of lightweight when it comes to nicotine.   The last PSE2 I smoked I got a serious buzz from.

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