Glass half Full: The Positives Post CV-19: Weekend Discussion.


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Pandemic done. 

Imagine that we are swimming in vaccine for CV-19 come 2021

What are the potential positives of 6-8 months lockdown. How has the world changed.......for the better. 

"Glass half full only"!!!!

How have/can industries/government (careful) ;) learn and change from this. 

How do we come out of this better?

 

Have a cracker weekend!:party:

 

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Some government services are now available online which would have normally taken 5-10 years of development. 

Workplaces that have been able to stay open will see the benefits of flexible work arrangements including the use of full-time remote staff and/or staff who can split working from home and the office. 

Improved remote learning for schools and universities. 

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In comparison, COVID-19 is relatively harmless.  It's not the Black Death.  So I find it quite encouraging to see that governments around the world either already have, or are actively developing, comprehensive plans to deal with pandemics.  If history teaches us anything it is that a bad one *will* come, and the experiences our institutions are collecting now will save humanity dow the line.  

 

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8 hours ago, El Presidente said:

How have/can industries/government (careful) ;) learn and change from this.

Here in the UK governments lurch and oversteer between wasting public money (New Labour),  and damaging austerity for the poorest (The Tories). 

As a Labour supporter, I do not mind accepting that the NHS is a very complicated operation and could benefit from improved influx of business common sense, but all too often this has been a cover story from The Tories to slash funding, and allow the NHS to run on life support. 

I want to see this focus on the NHS sustain, and pay these people what they are worth. In general this situation has put a spot light on some of the most poorly treated workforces in our society, nurses, delivery people, council staff, bin men, supermarket workers, the police etc.  I hope we can give them more money, a greater deal of respect, and don't just flick back to normal.

 

8 hours ago, El Presidente said:

potential positives

It's been nice to see nature unfurling it's wings and having a break from us.   Probably impossible, but it would be nice if there could almost be a collective effort on Sundays, for us as a county, or even globally to try and not get in the car, etc. 

Oh and it's been so wonderfully quiet!

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To me, something good that could come out of this is if after it's over, people view populist political movements that dismiss science and scientists with much more skepticism.  I'm skeptical myself that it'll happen, because we live in a world where measles is making a comeback and anti-vaxxers still spout their deep state conspiracy theories. I think that's one of the reasons why some cling to the myth that this disease is some kind of escaped bioweapon - the idea that it came about naturally and only science can save their asses is antithetical to the narrative they're trying to sell.

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It may change some people's shopping habits. Instead of considering going to some 'big box' store like IKEA and considering it as a leisure activity.

Also it may teach people to buy and eat more seasonally, and not expect strawberries and lamb cutlets in the middle of winter.

Although i'm far from a 'bleeding-heart', I hope  it helps people to see the common humanity and dignity of life in each other. The media has played-off the different sides of culture and politics for so long, hopefully we can all sit down with a nice beer and cigar and get on, and get along. (apologies for mentioning the 'P' word) 

   

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Getting a lot more time with my family now that I'm not spending 2 hours on the road getting to/from work.

Air sure seems cleaner around us.

Saving money not driving to work and eating out for lunch everyday.

Eating more healthy with home-cooked meals daily.

 

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Before the crisis I tended to work very long hours, and had very little time to smoke a nice cigar. Since the virus, I have now been able to enjoy some very nice cigars, and have made it a point to smoke some old stock which has brought me pleasure

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Due to a huge staff reduction, I’m now a barista from 8-12 and a server from noon to 6.  Almost every single customer that I have interacted with has been nothing short of fantastic.  It’s incredible.  And it’s brought out the best in most of the folks I meet.  

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Industry should learn slow growth, financial stability, and savings should be a priority, too many companies need bailout after 1 month of slowdown??? Maybe they will learn responsibility 
   People I hope will learn a little grace and gratitude for what blessings we do have,

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I believe we'll see many more people wearing masks regularly for the foreseeable future. I expect I will whenever I'm in crowded places or on airplanes once we're out of isolation.

This is going to be around for a long while before herd immunity materializes and vaccines become available.

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I hope that people will buy less crap after realizing how much crap they already had in their house... 

Air pollution has fallen dramatically in affected countries.  It won't last, but it's good while it lasts... and, ironically, air pollution probably kills more people prematurely than the COVID will ever kill.

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6 hours ago, DaBoot said:

Industry should learn slow growth, financial stability, and savings should be a priority, too many companies need bailout after 1 month of slowdown??? Maybe they will learn responsibility 
   People I hope will learn a little grace and gratitude for what blessings we do have,

Slowdown?  30 days?  How 'bout "stop indefinitely." 

Businesses don't stockpile capital reserves (taxable) to maintain a workforces and operational expenses that don't work or get used, and with good reason.  They layoff, cutback, borrow or shut down.  Cash reserves are for expansion.  

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While some may view it as a negative, for me I think a real positive would be to see some countries, mine included, start to put more emphasis on re-growing their manufacturing sectors within their borders.  I think we have all seen through this, that when you know what hits the fan, it is each country for itself.  Don't really fault any country for this approach. 

However, globalization and things like just in time supply chains have gutted many countries of their abilities to manufacture the goods they need in a crisis.  Items such as medical supplies and pharmaceuticals come to mind.  I think many of our countries would be much better off to have some of these critical goods manufactured "in-house" going forward.  Capitalism is absolutely wonderful, but by nature, it deploys capital in the most efficient place necessary.  As much as I favour small government, I think they could play a useful role here in providing incentives and the like to encourage a resurgence of home-grown manufacturing.  

It is difficult to overstate the importance the ability to repurpose manufacturing plants within the US played in allowing the Americans to win the last world war.  We have lost that ability in today's world and I think this pandemic has really hammered home the importance of this going forward.  Now all that being said, humans have shown a remarkable ability to quickly forget once a crisis has passed and revert back to their old ways so naively hopeful that this time is the exception.

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2 hours ago, Schumi5 said:

While some may view it as a negative, for me I think a real positive would be to see some countries, mine included, start to put more emphasis on re-growing their manufacturing sectors within their borders.  I think we have all seen through this, that when you know what hits the fan, it is each country for itself.  Don't really fault any country for this approach. 

However, globalization and things like just in time supply chains have gutted many countries of their abilities to manufacture the goods they need in a crisis.  Items such as medical supplies and pharmaceuticals come to mind.  I think many of our countries would be much better off to have some of these critical goods manufactured "in-house" going forward.  Capitalism is absolutely wonderful, but by nature, it deploys capital in the most efficient place necessary.  As much as I favour small government, I think they could play a useful role here in providing incentives and the like to encourage a resurgence of home-grown manufacturing.  

It is difficult to overstate the importance the ability to repurpose manufacturing plants within the US played in allowing the Americans to win the last world war.  We have lost that ability in today's world and I think this pandemic has really hammered home the importance of this going forward.  Now all that being said, humans have shown a remarkable ability to quickly forget once a crisis has passed and revert back to their old ways so naively hopeful that this time is the exception.

Spot on. Plus if we are looking to provide the most benefit to more people in our community manufacturing adds value in an economy up and down the supply chain and so leverages a flow on effect to spread prosperity around. More so, generally speaking, than say jobs in services. The Europeans have shown us that high value manufacturing can be done in higher labour cost countries. It's worth it. Up until March there was quite a bit of "reshoring' of manufacturing back to Aus from China and India. Advantages are seen in shorter logistics and the ability to innovate products faster - plus an honest assessment of the hidden costs of off-shoring manufacturing. 

Perfect example: Evolve Group in Brisbane has re-shored many products and after only 2 weeks of preparation are well on the way to starting production of N95 masks, 60,000 a day, by the end of April. http://www.evolvegrp.com/news/

Edited by bolivr
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