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So I showed my friend this cigar as I was smoking it and he said how is it for a budget cigar? I said what do you mean budget. He said mix filler. I replied, not sure it is.

Well he is a cigar guy very knowledgeable about tatuaje cigars and said that’s what the serie P stands for. Picadores meaning mix or choppers as I looked up on the old google.

He said Pete Johnson and Pepin mentioned on a nica trip he went on that this is what it means.

So what’s the meaning or relationship here for the PL Picadores. To my understanding it’s all long filler.

 

 

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4 minutes ago, havanaclub said:

 

So I showed my friend this cigar as I was smoking it and he said how is it for a budget cigar? I said what do you mean budget. He said mix filler. I replied, not sure it is.

Well he is a cigar guy very knowledgeable about tatuaje cigars and said that’s what the serie P stands for. Picadores meaning mix or choppers as I looked up on the old google.

He said Pete Johnson and Pepin mentioned on a nica trip he went on that this is what it means.

So what’s the meaning or relationship here for the PL Picadores. To my understanding it’s all long filler.

Not sure what P has to do with Picadores. It was a revival of an old discontinued model name. Picador means "bullfighter on horseback". 

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image.jpeg.a86279ffabda4e00c991309860044063.jpeg
A picador is one of the pair of horse-mounted bullfighters in a Spanish-style bullfight that jab the bull with a lance. They perform in the tercio de varas, which is the first of the three stages in a stylized bullfight. 
Wiki

Yes I saw that same picture. Also saw this 7af4221109ffbb894a483dba605ca26c.png


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Not sure what P has to do with Picadores. It was a revival of an old discontinued model name. Picador means "bullfighter on horseback". 

As I mentioned, serie P in a tatuaje cigar apparently means picadores which Pete and Pepin translates to mix according to them.
I didn’t mean this to be the same as the PL Picadores. I was just wondering where this name came from for this cuban model.


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8 minutes ago, havanaclub said:


As I mentioned, serie P in a tatuaje cigar apparently means picadores which Pete and Pepin translates to mix according to them.
I didn’t mean this to be the same as the PL Picadores. I was just wondering where this name came from for this cuban model.

I would imagine the name was intended to be the bullfighter on horseback...

I'm really not seeing a definitive source for Picadores and "chop" although I did see "chopping block". Hashers is given as a waiter or waitress in a hash house.

The first usage of Picador is given as 1789 meaning bullfighter on horseback.

Not sure where the usage of the word came from in reference to short fillers. Possibly Nicaraguan slang. 

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I would imagine the name was intended to be the bullfighter on horseback...
I'm really not seeing a definitive source for Picadores and "chop" although I did see "chopping block". Hashers is given as a waiter or waitress in a hash house.
The first usage of Picador is given as 1789 meaning bullfighter of horseback.
Not sure where the usage of the word came from in reference to short fillers. Possibly Nicaraguan slang. 

That’s exactly what my friend said after I told him the responses here. Must be slang.
I didn’t think it had anything to do with this being scraps. I find the PL Picadores which I am smoking now to be good quality.


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3 minutes ago, havanaclub said:

I find the PL Picadores which I am smoking now to be good quality.

Be it slang or not, it has nothing to do with CCs (as is the case with most things NC.) PL Picadores are long filler, hand made, high quality.

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picadura
from The Century Dictionary.
noun: The scraps which accumulate in making “book d” fillers for cigars.

So, OK....not picadores

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Smoking cigars at bull fights are like hot dogs and crack jacks at a baseball game in Spain.  Maybe it's an ideal size for the occasion?  I think they are big on the corona gorda, extra, and robustos.

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1 hour ago, El Presidente said:

Long history of Bullfighting in Cuba 

 

 

 

interesting. but makes perfect sense. where the spanish goes, so too, the culture. in fact, if you think about it, be far more surprising if there was no history of bullfighting there.

rob, i am curious re the wiki quote - any idea what the difference is between a "stylized bullfight" and a normal one? 

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8 minutes ago, Ken Gargett said:

rob, i am curious re the wiki quote - any idea what the difference is between a "stylized bullfight" and a normal one? 

My understanding is that all bullfights are now stylized or ritualized.

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i looked up some of the stuff a mate from spain had sent me - he is an expert on bullfighting and has lectured on it all over europe. seems that the role of the Picador was formalised in 1836, in the acts laid down then, by the Tauromaquia of “Paquiro”, whatever that is. his main role is to lower the head. basically weaken the poor bull's neck strength. 

one other thing which i had heard before but didn't know the timing - the horses on which the picador ride only started getting protection in the 1920s (and it was a bit minimal even then). so as you can imagine, a lot of dead horses. and it often did not go so well for the picador after the bull had dropped the horse. 

i went to one fight in barcelona before they shut it down in that city and had a ball. cigars, beers etc. apparently considered poor form to cheer for the bull, but as a couple of locals, who'd been on the beer a lot longer than me, decided i was hemingway reincarnated (a lot, lot longer than than me), i was forgiven and we had a hoot. 

at one stage, it was bulls 2, bullfighters 1. and one of the two 'losing' bullfighters was still in hospital in the IC unit when we left spain a week later.

there was also a sensation when a bull refused to fight. a disgrace for the breeder. they ended up having to get half a dozen huge oxen into the ring to trot around until the bull joined them and trotted out with them (as you can imagine, just because the bull does not want to fight, it does not mean he'll obediently wander out of the ring). i understand such behaviour not only shames the breeder but ensures that steak is on the menu that evening. 

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7 minutes ago, Bijan said:

My understanding is that all bullfights are now stylized or ritualized.

but what does that mean? is that just a fancy way of saying bullfight or is there more to it? 

i guess what i am trying to find out is if there is a difference between bullfights as we traditionally knew them and "stylized" ones. 

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4 minutes ago, Ken Gargett said:

but what does that mean? is that just a fancy way of saying bullfight or is there more to it? 

i guess what i am trying to find out is if there is a difference between bullfights as we traditionally knew them and "stylized" ones. 

According to the Wikipedia the current style of Spanish bullfighting in 3 acts came about in the 19th century. But bull fighting has been going on since before Roman times. I assume at some point it was more of a free for all, and less of a choreographed affair.

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9 minutes ago, Bijan said:

According to the Wikipedia the current style of Spanish bullfighting in 3 acts came about in the 19th century. But bull fighting has been going on since before Roman times. I assume at some point it was more of a free for all, and less of a choreographed affair.

i think that date of 1836 is one of the key dates in what you say re the three acts. my friend's paper looks at the relationship between humans and bulls back tens of thousands of years and also notes that in julius ceasar's time, BC, that there were 200 amphitheatres across europe for bullfighting. so definitely around for a long time. 

if you send me an email address, i'll send the paper my friend sent me on all this. fascinating stuff.

but i think i follow. what we know as bullfighting is technically now called stylized. 

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6 hours ago, PuroDiario said:

Your friend is mixing “Picadura de tabaco” which means “ground tobacco” roughly with Picador which its meaning is the described above. 

 

6 hours ago, Habana Mike said:

picadura
from The Century Dictionary.
noun: The scraps which accumulate in making “book d” fillers for cigars.

So, OK....not picadores

Correct - someone is mixing up Picadores with Picadura .... ?

But nice to read about bullfighting instead of shortfiller. Carry on.

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4 hours ago, Ken Gargett said:

i think that date of 1836 is one of the key dates in what you say re the three acts. my friend's paper looks at the relationship between humans and bulls back tens of thousands of years and also notes that in julius ceasar's time, BC, that there were 200 amphitheatres across europe for bullfighting. so definitely around for a long time. 

if you send me an email address, i'll send the paper my friend sent me on all this. fascinating stuff.

but i think i follow. what we know as bullfighting is technically now called stylized. 

There is also the fascinating practice of bull-leaping in ancient Minoan culture.  The bull leaper figurine was one of the most interesting pieces (to me) featured in The History of the World in 100 Objects.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minoan_Bull-leaper

And coincidentally I just finished Mary Renault's novel, The King Must Die, which puts a humanist spin on the myth of Theseus, his bull leaping in Knossos and the Minotaur.  

As has been said, this is a great forum!

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9 hours ago, NSXCIGAR said:

I would imagine the name was intended to be the bullfighter on horseback...

I'm really not seeing a definitive source for Picadores and "chop" although I did see "chopping block". Hashers is given as a waiter or waitress in a hash house.

The first usage of Picador is given as 1789 meaning bullfighter on horseback.

Not sure where the usage of the word came from in reference to short fillers. Possibly Nicaraguan slang. 

I would also think that PL Picadores is meant to be about the bullfighter on horseback.

But : Picar in Cuban Spanish means "to cut" ( in Castilian Spanish "cortar" ) and that is where the word Picadura derives from - meaning short filler but the "official" word for short filler is Tripa Corta, which you see stamped as TC on the box bottom.

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I don’t know anything about bull fighting, so I’ll just leave this here...

C7C910A6-024E-44B9-9A53-D1E891B5A8C4.jpeg

D05E0911-56E5-4E2E-BE93-9D47CAC39F78.jpeg

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