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I looked through the subs and wasn't sure if this should be asked here or in the humidor so please give me a heads up if wrong.

I am finishing a basement bar (liquor display cabinets across the top are final step).  Therefore I need a new project and got clearance from the tower to build a smoking room in the basement.  I have researched it on and off over the years but before I start buying supplies it would be cool to get some guidance/ideas from someone with more experience.  My Plan:

The basement is mostly finished and this is a storage area with a barn door opening currently.  Piping, water lines, support beams, etc. determine the available space to be 10' x 7' with 7.75' foot ceiling.  It is not abutting exterior wall.  I will frame it then seal it with plastic liner and spray insulation.  The barn door and a new interior door to access the pipes area will be installed with exterior grade sealed doors.  I would like to use glass paned for the barn door replacement for aesthetical reasons, not sure if that is a good idea though.  I will put in a tile floor for hard surface purposes and to complete the seal.  Planning to drywall but if my ventilation doesn't cut it I will panel the walls and ceiling for a hard surface/cleaning.

The ventilation will be 2 high powered oven hood exhaust fans with registers to restrict flow wired through timers.  One for exhaust and one for intake/return with both ported to the exterior walls using plastic sealed dryer vent hose/exterior louvred cover.  The exhaust port will be around the corner of the house from the intake, approximately 15' apart.  A rabbit air minusA2 will be used for purification.  If it proves necessary I will add an ozone machine on a timer to clean when exiting.

I use two newair wineadors for my humis but I don't plan on putting them in the room due to space and lingering smoke considerations.  Leather chairs, wall wine racks, small table, vintage Cuban cigar art with scantily clad beautiful senoritas/you know, all the appropriate swag.

Any thoughts are really appreciated.

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Smoking rooms in basements are tough, but your plan looks like it covers all the bases required. Smoke is most likely to escape when the door opens, and depending on how sensitive your cohabitants are that might or might not be an issue. Those occasional “wafts” of odor don’t create a lingering smell though, in my experience. 

Would love to see some step by steps or the finished product when complete. Good luck!

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Nice looking bar!  I hope you can pull off the new project as you expect it.

A couple thoughts from someone who also contemplated a similar project:

1. Every time you open or close a door of any kind to that room, some of that smell is going to escape.  It sounds like you're putting a lot of effort and expense into making an air tight room of sorts but there is a pretty solid chance it will not perfectly eliminate the chance of odor in the rest of the house or basement.

2.  Effective exhaust and fresh air replenishment are incredibly important.  Make sure you are moving a lot of air with your fans.  The longer the runs to the outside wall, the stronger those fans are going to have to be.  Also, you probably will have to plan for additional heating in the winter.

3.  In a small room like you're describing, high powered fans can get very noisy.

Ultimately, I decided the expense wasn't worth it for me since I couldn't be convinced that I would never see "the tower" holding her nose when I went back upstairs.  As such, I made my garage as comfortable as I can by installing a vent fan and small gas furnace in the ceiling.  

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4 minutes ago, Chibearsv said:

I made my garage as comfortable as I can by installing a vent fan and small gas furnace in the ceiling.  

This has been my solution as well - this year’s upgrade was an AC unit for summer smoking in hot or humid weather. 

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7 minutes ago, MrBirdman said:

This has been my solution as well - this year’s upgrade was an AC unit for summer smoking in hot or humid weather. 

What kind of AC unit did you install?  I don't have a window in the garage so I think that would be a challenge.  We're about to start a backyard patio remodel where we will have a 14X16 pavilion with a tin roof, ceiling fan, and infra-red heaters to extend our outdoor season as long as possible.  Heat doesn't bother me nearly as much as it used to when I was younger so some shade and a fan is usually just fine for me.  

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1 minute ago, Chibearsv said:

What kind of AC unit did you install?

15,000 BTU window unit - I’m fortunate to have two windows in my garage, one for the AC and the other for ventilation. 

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put the fans at the exit points. keep the noise to a minimum

you will establish positive air flow by having one blowing in and one out, I would make the outlet the closest to the outside wall.

Install the input fan opposite the exhaust in the room.

the timer is a great idea, because you can set it to clean the room after you leave, always a plus.

 

I think it might help to position the input hose low down, to take advantage of the heat in the room, it will naturally flow up anyway.

maybe set it at 3 ft from the floor, if possible.

you will also get some air from around and under the door unless you seal it, keep this in mind. maybe leave some gap and try it before you seal it up.

it would be nice if your fans have multiple speed settings, you may be able to get enough flow on medium speed and save high speed for a "room full " of smokers.

a small space heater will help keep you warm in winter.

 

best of luck,and please show us your progress.........

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4 hours ago, Chibearsv said:

A couple thoughts from someone who also contemplated a similar project:

1. Every time you open or close a door of any kind to that room, some of that smell is going to escape.  It sounds like you're putting a lot of effort and expense into making an air tight room of sorts but there is a pretty solid chance it will not perfectly eliminate the chance of odor in the rest of the house or basement.

2.  Effective exhaust and fresh air replenishment are incredibly important.  Make sure you are moving a lot of air with your fans.  The longer the runs to the outside wall, the stronger those fans are going to have to be.  Also, you probably will have to plan for additional heating in the winter.

3.  In a small room like you're describing, high powered fans can get very noisy.

Thanks!  I am planning to use 180 CFM fans and hoping the rabbit air combo will cover the job.  I recently replaced one in a bathroom and it is fairly quiet with good power.  The runs to the exterior walls are approximately 2.5 exhaust and 3.5 feet intake (Edit: 7 feet lowered idea) done with dryer vent covered in plasti-dip.  The additional heat will come from a portable unit we have sitting around. 

Unfortunately I have a windowless, rather large garage or I would be looking into that route.  I will have an air filter running outside the door but acknowledge there will be leaking when door is used.

 

4 hours ago, garbandz said:

I think it might help to position the input hose low down, to take advantage of the heat in the room, it will naturally flow up anyway.

maybe set it at 3 ft from the floor, if possible.

you will also get some air from around and under the door unless you seal it, keep this in mind. maybe leave some gap and try it before you seal it up.

it would be nice if your fans have multiple speed settings, you may be able to get enough flow on medium speed and save high speed for a "room full " of smokers.

Excellent advice on the input location as well as a dimmer switch for the fans.  Thanks.  I'll be sure to update.

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I would suggest using inline fans, which you can put in the duct itself and anchor closer to the wall away from the vents to reduce noise. Placing mine close to the vent is my biggest regret, as the system is quite loud. It does work like gangbusters however. I think if you have enough negative airflow and your house has modern hvac a cold air return or positive flow is not strictly required. I do not have one and my smoking room works well but for the noise of 900 cfm blaring at full blast. 

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1 minute ago, dominattorney said:

inline, 900 cfm 

Wow, okay, I need to find new fans.  Thanks

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51 minutes ago, Riverstyx said:

I used a 560 cfm fan for my build.  You can see details and others' opinions here:

Thank you, very helpful and a beautiful office.

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5 hours ago, Chibearsv said:

 

2.  Effective exhaust and fresh air replenishment are incredibly important.  Make sure you are moving a lot of air with your fans.  The longer the runs to the outside wall, the stronger those fans are going to have to be.  Also, you probably will have to plan for additional heating in the winter

Outside air replenishment is often overlooked. What goes out must eventually come back in, and it will. By any means necessary...

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7 hours ago, therealrsr said:

Wow, okay, I need to find new fans.  Thanks

It's two 450 cfm fans working together through different ducts

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context to the space.  thanks everyone! I will try to build update, but I am not good at remembering to pic.

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I would be careful of any woven fabrics that will absorb the smoke.  Just like in a car.

Also, a major source of stink are the ashes and cigar nubs.  They should be collected somewhere well sealed until they can be tossed in the garden or outside trash or whatever.

And nothing wrong with a smoking jacket or robe to wear while in the room.

Maybe install a door from the basement into the main house if not one there already.

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4 hours ago, Kevin48438 said:

And nothing wrong with a smoking jacket or robe to wear while in the room.

It was all funny, but that is my favorite by far.

 

The tower just read all this and still aproves.  I'm a lucky guy.

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52 minutes ago, dominattorney said:

Are you going to drywall the ceiling after the fan and vent install? That will be a must. 

I am drywalling and planning to run seal and blow insulation.

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Like Chibearsfan said, pay attention to the makeup air in relation to the exhaust. If it is out of balance it will make up from where ever it can get it from (sink drain, toilet, etc)

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